Wireless router IP totally different range than cabled computers

When I connect laptops to my wireless router, the IP's are totally different than my cabled computers. My wireless router IP is 10.15.XX.XX. My cabled computers are 192.168.XX.XX. Here's how its setup:

ISP Modem>Watchguard firewall>Netgear switch>patch panel.

The wireless router is setup like this:

Wireless Router (in Internet port)>Netgear patch panel

Why are my wireless IP's so different? I need them all to be 192.168.xx.xx.

Thanks!!!!
brasimanAsked:
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
Your wireless router has a DHCP capability switched on. Disable it and then your IP will come from your normal networks DHCP server.
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SommerblinkCommented:
You need to place your wireless device into Access Port/AP mode.

Sometimes this is as simple as deactivating DHCP on the wireless management and plugging a cable from the netgear switch into one of the LAN ports of the wireless router. You won't use the Internet port.

Depending on the wireless device, you may not be able to do this. If you find that you aren't able to do this, then you will need to purchase a wireless Access Point.

Also, please be sure to deactivate DHCP on the wireless router prior to plugging this into the wired network. It will cause problems if anything asks for an IP address on the wired network before disabling it.
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Nick RhodeIT DirectorCommented:
As stated by Neilsr and Sommerblink its DHCP that's turned on.  So its sending out different IP addresses and if its still in router mode vs AP mode it can cause some issues across the network.  If its set in AP mode then just turn of DHCP and your server will handle it or whatever device you use for DHCP.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
The best way (in my opinion) for a small network is to hook up a wireless router as follows:

Hook up a LAN port (not WAN port) of the wireless router to a LAN port on the network.
Give it a Static IP on the network.
As suggested above, turn DHCP OFF.

Now it is an integral part of your network. I do this frequently and it works.
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
Here is a diagram of what John Hurst describes.

Some configuration wizards will balk a bit at not having a WAN/internet connection but you can generally work around that by manually configuring everything.  Since you aren't using the wireless device as a router at all, you don't have to worry about gateway, DNS addresses, etc.  All of that work is done by the network's DHCP server - which is NOT the wireless router here.  The intent is that the wireless router is really only acting as a switch with wireless capability.
Wireless-Router-as-a-Simple-Switch-and-A
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brasimanAuthor Commented:
You guys are awesome! Thanks!
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