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To open the file

Hi,
Is there any tools to open the binary file below
https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/40211031/flout.rar

within Win 7 machine?
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HuaMinChen
Asked:
HuaMinChen
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2 Solutions
 
Ajay Kumar BurraAssociateCommented:
For the .rar extension files try to use the Winrar software or 7Zip. Both are the extract and Archive softwares other than WinZip.
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Phil PhillipsDirector of DevOpsCommented:
That looks like a RAR archive.  I like to use 7-zip.
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HuaMinChenBusiness AnalystAuthor Commented:
No, I mean to open the .bin file, that is within the .rar file. thanks
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dbruntonCommented:
It depends on what application made the bin file and what it is used for.

It could well be a CD/DVD image file.

First extract the bin file from the RAR file.  Use 7-Zip as suggested.

Try IsoBuster (the free version) http://www.isobuster.com/ and point it to the BIN file and see what it makes of it.
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HuaMinChenBusiness AnalystAuthor Commented:
No, definitely, that is a binary file. How to open it?
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Phil PhillipsDirector of DevOpsCommented:
For .bin files, I've used Virtual Clone Drive to mount them.  I haven't used it on Windows 7, but it should work.

Some other alternatives:

DAEMON Tools
IsoBuster
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HuaMinChenBusiness AnalystAuthor Commented:
No, .bin is just the extension, and it is generated using C++ codes, to hold one set of records.
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Phil PhillipsDirector of DevOpsCommented:
Gotcha.  In that case, like dbrunton said, it very well depends on what generated the file.  I'm unable to tell based on the file alone (but maybe someone else will recognize it).

Do you have more information on what was used to generate it?  For example, if you happen to know if a certain library was used to write the data, then that would be helpful information.
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HuaMinChenBusiness AnalystAuthor Commented:
Phil,
I know it is binary file holding list of records, and need to seek the way to view its contents. thanks
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dbruntonCommented:
>>  to hold one set of records.

You'd need to know the data structure of the records in the C++ codes.  And the fields in the data structure whether they be numbers (integers, long integers, signed or unsigned, octal, hexadecimal, or decimal), strings or other types of data.

You could use a hex editor to view the file contents.  That might give you an idea of the data structure but unless you have an idea of what to expect it is a very small might.

Playing with a hex editor is NOT fun.
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HuaMinChenBusiness AnalystAuthor Commented:
Yes, there is integer and string to the record. and which Hex editor is able to view the file above?
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dbruntonCommented:
Any hex editor you like should be able to view the file.

Here's a free one http://mh-nexus.de/en/hxd/

Look carefully at the image at the top of the page there because that is the type of data you are going to see.  Not pretty and unless you have an idea of what is there almost unintelligible.
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HuaMinChenBusiness AnalystAuthor Commented:
Many thanks Dbrunton.
I know the relevant process is writing char/wchar_t/int, as record to the binary file. But how can I understand from what I see in the file being opened(which is attached)?
t880.png
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sarabandeCommented:
But how can I understand from what I see in the file being opened
see the right column where the printable codes of the left byte table are visualized. you see text beginning with "AAAJqrWPt". that is the fld_nm of the first nameval record written to the file. 5 lines deeper you see the same key in wide characters (with an extra zero byte). the next record is about 20 lines deeper, and so on.

the key looks ok (it starts with "AAA" what looks fine), but the file is not correct, cause it doesn't begin with the key but has a 64-byte offset (mostly zero's).

see attached file how a correct file begins.

picture of a valid bin file in hex editor

Sara
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sarabandeCommented:
sorry, I didn't recognized that your snapshot didn't show the file from begin but somewhere in the middle.

so, it seems to be a correct file.

can you search for a key in the file? I don't know the hex editor you used but it should have a find function where you could search for text keys. you also should scroll to different places in the file and check whether the keys are correctly ordered.

Sara
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dbruntonCommented:
Right.

This looks like a structure of 304 bytes.  sarabande's post shows this nicely.  Breaking it down we have

char[100]
wchar_t[100]  where wchar_t are 16 bits or 2 bytes
longint  using 4 bytes.  Unsure whether it is signed or unsigned.

The wchar string is just a copy of the char string but implemented as wide.

So you could write a C program reading in 304 bytes at a time into a structure as described above and easily displaying the data.
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sarabandeCommented:
dbrunton, Hua already has two programs. one to write the file and one which does a binary search in the file. see his previous question: http:Q_28571052.html

the task here he created because the search did not work correctly for a file with 10 million records and Hua looked for a way to check the contents of the binary file.

I found out that the file is good and that the issue of the binary search was due to an integer overflow because the file size was greater than 2.1 GB.

Sara
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