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Query with Distinct Count

Posted on 2014-12-10
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Last Modified: 2015-01-19
Dear All,

I have a question about using the Count function.  I'm trying to count the number of records in Field 4 for each combination of field1, field 2 and field3.

The input table -

Input Table to Query
The output I'm looking for-

Desired Output
Below is my query it seems to counting the number of records in field 4 and assigning it to field2, instead of breaking it down according to field3.    

SELECT [LocationData].Field1, Count([LocationData]. Field4) AS Field4_Count, MonitoredData.Field2, MonitoredData.Field3
FROM [LocationData] INNER JOIN MonitoredData ON [LocationData].Field2 = MonitoredData.Field2
GROUP BY [LocationData].Field1, MonitoredData.Field2, MonitoredData.Field3
HAVING ((([LocationData].Field1) Is Not Null));

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I thought the names would make it easier to explain now I don't think so!

Thanks
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Question by:AndyC1000
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3 Comments
 
LVL 50

Assisted Solution

by:Gustav Brock
Gustav Brock earned 167 total points
ID: 40493279
Maybe you just need to rearrange the field sequence:

SELECT
    [LocationData].Field1,
    MonitoredData.Field2,
    MonitoredData.Field3,
    Count(*) AS Field4_Count

/gustav
0
 
LVL 54

Assisted Solution

by:Huseyin KAHRAMAN
Huseyin KAHRAMAN earned 166 total points
ID: 40493544
try this:

select field1, field2, field3, count(1) as cnt
from mytable
group by field1, field2, field3
0
 
LVL 37

Accepted Solution

by:
PatHartman earned 167 total points
ID: 40494075
I don't see anything wrong with the query although, I would use a where clause rather than a having for this particular condition.  The WHERE clause is applied BEFORE any aggregation and the HAVING clause is applied AFTER aggregation so HAVING usually refers to something that was aggregated so you can sum amounts for example and select only the rows that have a net > 0.  Field1 isn't aggregated so it would be the same going in as coming out so get rid of it at the beginning.

Also Count(somefield) doesn't do what you think it does.  Count(somefield) eliminates nulls so
fld1, fld2, fld3
a, 1, x
a, 1, null
a, 1, y

the count would be
a, 1, 2

but if you use Count(*), the count would be
a, 1, 3
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