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CItrix vCPU Allocation in VMware

Posted on 2014-12-11
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We have a few Citrix XenApp (6.x) servers running on a VMware estate. The underlying hardware has multiple CPUs and cores.

I read somewhere that it is not advisable to simply give Citrix all available vCPUs as this can actually have a negative impact on performance rather than a position one.

Can anybody advise on the best practice?
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Question by:Hypervizor
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 2000 total points
ID: 40494249
Yes, I would allocate 2 vCPU (sockets not cores), maybe possibly 4 vCPUs.

but to be honest, you are better, with 2 vCPU servers, and more of them, in the farm.

vSMP (virtual SMP) can affect virtual machine performance, when adding too many vCPUs to virtual machines that cannot use the vCPUs effectly, e.g. Servers than can use vSMP correctly :- SQL Server, Exchange Server.

This is true, many VMware Administrators, think adding lots of processors, will increase performance - wrong! (and because they can, they just go silly!). Sometimes there is confusion between cores and processors. But what we are adding is additional processors in the virtual machine.

So 4 vCPU, to the VM is a 4 Way SMP (Quad Processor Server), if you have Enterprise Plus license you can add 8, (and only if you have the correct OS License will the OS recognise them all).

If applications, can take advantage e.g. Exchange, SQL, adding additional processors, can/may increase performance.

So usual rule of thumb is try 1 vCPU, then try 2 vCPU, knock back to 1 vCPU if performance is affected. and only use vSMP if the VM can take advantage.

Example, VM with 4 vCPUs allocated!

My simple laymans explaination of the "scheduler!"

As you have assigned 4 vCPUs, to this VM, the VMware scheulder, has to wait until 4 cores are free and available, to do this, it has to pause the first cores, until the 4th is available, during this timeframe, the paused cores are not available for processes, this is my simplistic view, but bottom line is adding more vCPUs to a VM, may not give you the performance benefits you think, unless the VM, it's applications are optimised for additional vCPUs.

See here
http://www.vmware.com/resources/techresources/10131

see here
http://www.gabesvirtualworld.com/how-too-many-vcpus-can-negatively-affect-your-performance/

http://www.zdnet.com/virtual-cpus-the-overprovisioning-penalty-of-vcpu-to-pcpu-ratios-4010025185/

also there is a document here about the CPU scheduler

www.vmware.com/files/pdf/perf-vsphere-cpu_scheduler.pdf

https://blogs.vmware.com/vsphere/2013/10/does-corespersocket-affect-performance.html
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by:Carl Webster
ID: 40503309
Project Virtual Reality Check says you get best results with either 4 vCPUs or 8 vCPUs.

http://www.projectvrc.com/white-papers

http://www.projectvrc.com/white-papers/8-phase-2-hyper-v-2008r2-vsphere-4-xenserver-55-v20/file
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