Closing an Excel Object from MS Access

If I am looping a table and creating an Excel Spreadsheet from each row in my MS Access recordset (within MS Access ) ? Do I need to close the instance of Excel after each export or at the end of the routine ?

templatefile = mytemplate.xltx
outputfile = myexcelfile.xlsx

Set xlobj = CreateObject("Excel.Application)
xlobj.workbooks.Add templatefile

Set rs = My Recordset
Start Loop
Export to  outputfile
Next
Loop

rs.close
xlobj.quit
set xlobj = Nothing
upobDaPlayaAsked:
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Nick67Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Indeed, I am.
You open the application object outside the loop, and close it after the loop completes

Set rs = My Recordset
 Set xlobj = CreateObject("Excel.Application)
 Start Loop

  xlobj.workbooks.Add templatefile
  'copy recordset here
 
  xlobj.activeworkbook.saveas  "<path to folder>\myexcelfile.xlsx

 Next
 Loop

  xlobj.quit  

 rs.close
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Nick67Commented:
Close files when you are done with them via .Save  Close Objects when you intend to reuse the objects via another Set statement.  Close Objects and aet them equal to nothing when you have no further use for the.
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Nick67Commented:
Stupid touchscreen phone makes me spell like an imbecile!
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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Connect With a Mentor Commented:
since you arecreating an Excel Spreadsheet from each recordset, you have to save the excel
for each recordset


Set rs = My Recordset
Start Loop
Set xlobj = CreateObject("Excel.Application)
 xlobj.workbooks.Add templatefile
 'copy recordset here
 
 xlobj.activeworkbook.saveas  "<path to folder>\myexcelfile.xlsx
 xlobj.quit  
Next
Loop

rs.close
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Nick67Commented:
You must be careful with terminology
You open an Excel.Application
Then you open an Excel.Workbook
The workbook is an xls file
You add an Excel.Worksheet
You then add stuff to cells on the worksheet.

Export to  outputfile can mean TransferSpreadsheet or CopyFromRecordset
How are you using the template file?

Regardless in the loop you can open a workbook from a template, set a Worksheet object to something from the template file, do stuff, save and close it.
You can then reuse the sheet and workbook objects by issuing new Set statements
When your loop is complete, you then close all objects and set them to nothing.

There's no need to close the Excel.Application object until the very end.
An Excel.Application with no workbooks open is like opening Excel and closing the blank workbook.
An Excel workbook without sheets looks like a open file that you've deleted all the sheets from.

You can issue
xlobj.Visible
xlobj.UserControl = true
and what what your loop is doing occur
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upobDaPlayaAuthor Commented:
Nick, then you seem to be contradicting Rey as Rey is closing the object after saving the first workbook ?
Set rs = My Recordset
Start Loop
Set xlobj = CreateObject("Excel.Application)
 xlobj.workbooks.Add templatefile
 'copy recordset here
 
 xlobj.activeworkbook.saveas  "<path to folder>\myexcelfile.xlsx
 xlobj.quit  
Next
Loop

rs.close
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upobDaPlayaAuthor Commented:
If I do it Nicks way and my loop is large..thus, lets say I create 100 individual Excel Workbooks via the Loop and  CopyFrom Recordset rs then will the db crash due to memory usage since I wait to the very end to close the object or is this insignificant ?

Just want to make sure I do it efficiently from a memory perspective also...
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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
both set of codes will work

if you set the  Set xlobj = CreateObject("Excel.Application) inside the loop,  xlobj.quit  must be inside the loop


if you set the  Set xlobj = CreateObject("Excel.Application)  outside the loop,  xlobj.quit  must be outside the loop
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Nick67Commented:
It is less efficient to quit the application is the nwzt iteration of the loop will demand you just re-create it.  All of this is VBA, so it will be stable enough.  And even if you Quit/restart Excel - which isn't as efficient - Windows will see that you are opening/closing it and leabe the bits in RAM to be reallocated.

The question was 'is it needful to close Excel'
It is not.
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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
yes it is, if you are doing a lot to the  excel file, not just copying a recordset, or you will experience some errors like method not allowed,
 ... object not set  etc,,
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Nick67Commented:
Rey,
No one disputes that you MUST close the Workbook objects.  Having a hundred workbooks open in a single instance of Excel will undoubtably lead to grief.  There is no need to flush the Excel.Application object, though.
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upobDaPlayaAuthor Commented:
Thanks its good to have both sets of opinions because it allowed me to question each suggestion, further research, implement and access..you guys are great thx again
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