I need assistance with a grid or datasheet in Access 2013

Hi Experts,
I have an ACCESS 2013 application. The application has a one to many relationship between the Job table (tblJob) and JobVenues table (tblJobVenues).

tblJob has the following fields:
JobID  (Primary Key - Auto Generate)
JobName
COntactName
ContactPhone
ContactEmail

tblJobVenues has the following fields:
JobVenueID (Primary Key - Auto Generate)
JobID (Foreign Key that links it to tblJob)
VenueName
Address1
Address2
City
State
Zip

I want my form to display the Job information, with it's related venues in a some sort of grid.
How do I do this?  Do I use a sub form, a form in Datasheet View, or something else?

I have attached a sample of what I want to accomplish to this post.  Thanks in advance.
Sample of grid
I tried the following code and it failed:
Subform Error
mrotor
mainrotorAsked:
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
1. Create a Form based on tblJob.
2. Create a second Form based on tblJobVenues. That form should be a Datasheet form.
3. With the first form open in Design view, drag the second form and drop it on the first form. This will create your subform.
4. On the first form, set the Master and Child link fields to be JobID for both.

Don't add code to set the Recordsource, or anything of that nature. Access will handle the relationships via the Master and Child link process.

Regarding your error: That generally means you are not correctly referring to the Subform. Note that Access names that object differently depending on how you add the Subform.
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Helen FeddemaCommented:
It is a good idea to give controls meaningful names, using the standard LNC (Leszynski Naming Convention) prefixes, to avoid confusion when reading code.  This convention is given in many books, and in my Wikipedia article on this topic:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leszynski_naming_convention
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