ISP v.s. VPN line speeds

I have a user who is telling me that on the VPN download = 8.71 mbps, upload speed = 7.94 mbps

Without VPN his home ISP offers, download = 92.47 mbps, upload speed = 9.65 mbps

Is this possible?
operationsITAsked:
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rharland2009Commented:
Unless you use split-tunneling, when your user is connected via VPN, he is limited by the speeds available to YOUR network - that is, the network where the VPN terminates. How big is the Internet pipe at your office?
Do you have any throttling or bandwidth usage limitations in effect for your VPN solution?
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JustInCaseCommented:
Of course it is possible.
The simplest case is:
The same user can have on other side of VPN tunnel also 100/10Mbps link, so effective transfer between two VPN locations would be 10/10Mbps. Download speed on one side - is limited by upload speed of other side of VPN tunnel. There's protocol overhead, decryption and encryption of traffic, it all takes time, so speed is always slower then unencrypted line (9.65Mbps - 7,94Mbps), etc...
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
As Predrag Iovic says... the VPN is limited by the *lower* of the upload speed at one end and corresponding download speed at the other end.  Then you apply this rule in both directions.

Perhaps less well known is that latency can have a major effect on apparent speed if the latency is large - such as half-way around the world.  In that case, latency affects hand-shaking speed which, in turn, affects actual throughput.  There are products being offered to help in those cases.
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operationsITAuthor Commented:
@rharland2009 - the office pipe is 100M
We do not have split tunnel so the VPN users are using our network pipe.

@Predrac jovic/fmarshall - Can you give me an example of this "the VPN is limited by the *lower* of the upload speed at one end and corresponding download speed at the other end.  Then you apply this rule in both directions."
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rharland2009Commented:
What they mean is this - your home user has a 100 down/10 up connection, for example.
Your office location at the other end of the VPN ALSO has a 100 down/10 up connection.
Home user connects via VPN. Without split-tunneling, this means that all traffic - both to the office resources AND the internet - traverses the VPN tunnel created between the two connections.
Home user, while connected to the VPN, does a download speed test.
Even though the office has a 100M pipe, the traffic to and from the home client while testing is constrained to 10M best case - because the internet traffic to the home client still has to traverse the 10M upstream link FROM the office to the home client.
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
OK:  
Let's assume that you have one site "A" that has 100 up / 100 down just to make it unrealistic but simple.
Let's also assume that you have another site "B" that has 10 up / 10 down.  More realistic maybe and also simple.

Now set up a VPN between the two.

Traffic from A to B can go up from A at 100 if theres some buffering "in the pipe".  
But that same traffic coming into B is limited at 10.
So, overall, the effective data rate from A to B is 10.
But you may have expected this because you know that B's down speed is 10.

Traffic from B to A can go up from B at 10.
Traffic from B to A might go down at A at 100 but only in bursts if that because B's up rate limits what can arrive.
So, overall, the effective data rate from B to A is 10.

Now let's make it a little more interesting and avoid any confusion because of the equal numbers I used above.  The numbers below are more typical of commodity / consumer connections with ADSL or even with cable connections:

Let's assume that you have one site "C" that has 5 up / 10 down.
Let's also assume that you have another site "D" that has 3 up / 10 down.

Traffic from C to D can go up from C at 5 if there's some buffering "in the pipe".  
And, that same traffic coming into D is limited to 10.
So, overall, the effective data rate from C to D is 5 because that's all C can provide.
This is a case where the upload speed at C limits.

Traffic from D to C can go up from D at 3.
Traffic from D to C might go down at C at 10 but only in bursts if that because D's up rate of 3 limits what can arrive at C.
So, overall, the effective data rate from D to C is 3 because that's all that D can provide.

Then, of course, there has to be handshaking and even perhaps some data sharing that's bigger "coming back".  (A file backup verification process might do that).  
- If most of the data is going UP from the site with slowest up speed then that will dominate.
- if some of the data is going up from the site with the highest up speed, then that will affect the speed and you won't achieve the higher up speed over all.
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operationsITAuthor Commented:
Great thank you for the details!
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