[2 days left] What’s wrong with your cloud strategy? Learn why multicloud solutions matter with Nimble Storage.Register Now

x
?
Solved

Migrate Active Directory from Server 2003 to Server 2012 R2

Posted on 2014-12-15
2
Medium Priority
?
218 Views
Last Modified: 2015-01-12
Hello Experts,

I have the following AD environment:

Functional Level: 2003

1 Windows Server 2003 = PDC, all FSMOs, Primary DNS, DHCP
1 Windows Server 2008 R2 = Backup Domain Controller

I am planning to add another Server 2012 R2  to become my next Primary Domain Controller. I will be migrating all FSMO roles from my Windows Server 2003 PDC to this new server and then decommission the Windows Server 2003 server and elevate the functional level of my domain to 2008.

My question is do I have to run ADPREP again before I can raise the 2012 server to become  a domain controller?
0
Comment
Question by:lappladmin
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 59

Accepted Solution

by:
Cliff Galiher earned 1000 total points
ID: 40501653
It depends on how you meant that question.

In 2012 and 2012 R2, the "add role" wizard will run adprep for you when you add the ADDS role. So yes adprep needs to happen, changes will be made, and a backup is wise. But no you do not need to run it manually first. It is now automated.
0
 
LVL 24

Assisted Solution

by:VB ITS
VB ITS earned 1000 total points
ID: 40502190
Cliff hits the nail on the head. ADPrep now runs automatically when you install the Active Directory Domain Services role starting from Windows Server 2012, so yes it still technically has to run. The AD DS role installation process just runs it automatically for you. The dcpromo command has also been deprecated starting from 2012, you promote the server to a DC via the wizard instead.
2012-Promote-to-DC.png
You can still opt to run ADPrep manually if you want as ADPrep.exe is stored in the \Support\Adprep directory on the 2012 installation media. The limitation when running ADPrep manually is that there is now only a 64-bit version of it and it can only run from a 64-bit version of Windows Server 2008 and later if you do decide to run it manually. Since you have a 2008 R2 server, it won't be a problem in this scenario.

You can read here for more information on the changes made to ADPrep in Server 2012/2012 R2: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd464018(v=ws.10).aspx#BKMK_WS2012
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Path Explorer

An intuitive utility to help find the CSS path to UI elements on a webpage. These paths are used frequently in a variety of front-end development and QA automation tasks.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

While rebooting windows server 2003 server , it's showing "active directory rebuilding indices please wait" at startup. It took a little while for this process to complete and once we logged on not all the services were started so another reboot is …
Windows Server 2003 introduced persistent Volume Shadow Copies and made 2003 a must-do upgrade.  Since then, it's been a must-implement feature for all servers doing any kind of file sharing.
In this Micro Tutorial viewers will learn how they can get their files copied out from their unbootable system without need to use recovery services. As an example non-bootable Windows 2012R2 installation is used which has boot problems.
This tutorial will walk an individual through the process of installing the necessary services and then configuring a Windows Server 2012 system as an iSCSI target. To install the necessary roles, go to Server Manager, and select Add Roles and Featu…

649 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question