How to run Power Shell script on a web server (Windows 2008 R2)

Hello,

I have a Power Shell Script that I need to run every 9 minutes.  
If I put it on a file share, how can I get the script to run every 9 minutes without using Windows Task Scheduler.
Is there a way to make it run by itself?

Windows Server 2008 R2
Rad1Asked:
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Why can't you use task scheduler?  That's its job, just like cron on Unix. It is pretty core to the OS.
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Rad1Author Commented:
Because I need it now.  At work will take me 3 weeks to get the task scheduler to be implemented.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Well firing off a script "now" is possible if WinRM is enabled. But the "repeat every 9 minutes" will require task scheduler. That's what it is there for. The only other way would be to deploy software that does what task scheduler does, and then you are in the same boat of not being able to do that "now" as it isn't core to the OS...it'd be a full software deployment.
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Rad1Author Commented:
What about creating a clock script and in the script, set a function to run every 9 minutes to run the Power Shell script.  Would that work?
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Not well. Scripts don't handle waits well. They basically brute force it by either forcibly throwing idle commands at a processor, which will kill performance of other threads, or by going to sleep, which isn't exact as to when the processor will return to check on the thread. The execute won't necessarily at 9 minutes, but sometime thereafter. If it were that easy, there'd be no need for a task scheduler.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
wrap your powershell script in the following
$sleeptime = 9 * 60
do {
add your script
start-sleep -seconds  $sleeptime
} while ( 1 -eq 1)
#this is an infinite loop
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Rad1Author Commented:
Excellent!!!
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