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best way to implement hyper v on a dell poweredge t320

Posted on 2014-12-17
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I have a Dell PE T320 with
24gig ram
1TB RAID1 partition using 2 x 7.2k sata disks
its using the following cpu Intel Xeon E5-2407 v2 2.40GHz, 10M Cache, 6.4GT/s QPI, No Turbo, 4C, 80W, Max Mem 1333MHz
I need to run 1 DC and 1 Exchange 2013 server for around 15 users
could anyone please give some advice on the best way to achieve this or any tips when it comes to running hyper v
I was thinking of doing the following so please correct any mistakes im making
on physical host create a c drive partition of around 60gig
create a  D drive partition of the remaining 940 gig to store my virtual server disks
Install only the hyper v role and the backup role on the physical server
Use 1 nic for management and the other nic for VM traffic
create 1 Virtual DC with 1 cpu and 8 gig ram and say 500 gig disk space
create 1 Virtual exchange 2013 server with 1 cpu and14 gig ram with 400 gig drive space
use the remaining 2 gig ram for the physical hyper v host
backup both servers to usb disk from hyper v host
would this be ok?
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Question by:dougdog
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Philip Elder earned 250 total points
ID: 40504535
Please have a look at my EE Hyper-V Hardware and Software Best Practices article.

I suggest also reading: Repeat After Me: SATA Does Not Belong in Servers. Microsoft is finally on the record. DCs should be on Gen2 VMs with a SAS disk subsystem to best protect the databases.

That SATA RAID 1 will _not_ have enough IOPS to run much of anything beyond the host OS.
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by:dougdog
ID: 40504548
I know though its all I have for now
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by:Philip Elder
ID: 40504554
Then follow the guidance presented in my article for your setup.
 + 90GB partition for host OS
 + Balance GB for Hyper-V guest files

Networking:
 + Team two NIC ports
 + Bind vSwitch to the team leaving Host OS shared

Guests:
 + 90GB VHDX OS
 + 250GB-400GB VHDX Data
 + DC: 2 vCPUs and 6GB vRAM
 + Exchange: 3 vCPUs and 16GB vRAM

Backup:
 + ShadowProtect Virtual in-guest backup to shared folder on USB attached to host.

We don't do host based backups. That's not a good thing to do. In-Guest is best unless Veeam becomes an option.
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by:VB ITS
VB ITS earned 250 total points
ID: 40504555
on physical host create a c drive partition of around 60gigcreate a  D drive partition of the remaining 940 gig to store my virtual server disks
There's no real benefit from partitioning the RAID1 array as it can make extending the C: drive a nightmare if it runs out of space (as an example), so I would just keep it simple and set up a single partition then store the Hyper-V VMs in C:\Hyper-V\Virtual Machines or something along those lines. Depending on the number of mailboxes and users in your environment I'd look at purchasing 4x 10k/15k SAS drives in a RAID10 array and putting the VHDs on this instead.  Providing you have available drive bays, look at also getting a single entry-level SATA drive and place dedicated VHD files for page files, VSS data, and other non-essential data on this drive.
Install only the hyper v role and the backup role on the physical server
What 'backup role' are you referring to here? Third party backup software or the built-in Windows Server Backup feature? If the plan is to use the 2 free virtual machine instances that come with 2012 R2 Standard then you need to keep in mind that the host can only be used to manage the VMs and nothing else, otherwise you will be violating Microsoft's licensing terms and be liable for fines should you get audited by Microsoft. Take this advice as gospel though and speak to your local Microsoft rep for confirmation.
Use 1 nic for management and the other nic for VM traffic
Depending on the total number of NICs available, I'd look at teaming the NICs used for the VMs at the very least for redundancy. Although rare, network cables and switch ports do fail.
create 1 Virtual DC with 1 cpu and 8 gig ram and say 500 gig disk space
You could get away with 1 vCPU but speaking from past experience I would assign at least 2 vCPUs for better performance, especially if you are going to be working on these servers on a daily basis doing management tasks. 4GB of RAM will also suffice, 8GB would be a waste if it's only going to act as your DC and file/print server. I'd also go with a 80GB fixed-size VHDX file for the system drive, then provision a 400GB dynamically expanding VHDX file for data shares, etc.
create 1 Virtual exchange 2013 server with 1 cpu and14 gig ram with 400 gig drive space
Go with 4 vCPUs and 16GB of RAM. Do not use Dynamic Memory for this VM as this is not recommended nor supported by Microsoft. The Intel Xeon E5-2407 has four logical cores and Microsoft recommends a virtual processor to logical processor ratio of 1:1 when it comes to assigning vCPUs, although a 2:1 ratio is supported. So far we have assigned 6 vCPUs so you're still within the limit. Also make sure you use fix sized VHDX files for this VM as Microsoft don't support dynamically expanding drives.
use the remaining 2 gig ram for the physical hyper v host
At this point you'll have 4GB of RAM leftover for the host which will be more than enough considering it's only hosting VMs and doing nothing else.
backup both servers to usb disk from hyper v host
See my previous comment regarding licensing if you opt to use the two free virtual instances that come with 2012 R2 Standard. You aren't technically allowed to install any other role or third party software on the host as that will void the licensing terms but again, you'll need to confirm this with your Microsoft contact.

Have a look at some of the articles and free tools that Microsoft provides for virtualizing Exchange 2013:
I hope all this has been of some help.
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by:dougdog
ID: 40504613
many thanks its a great help
I know I messed up on the disks being 7.2k sata
for 10 users would these disks be ok for now
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by:VB ITS
ID: 40504656
I wouldn't recommend it, especially if you'll be using the same disks for the Hyper-V host. You're not going to get very good performance but you're more than welcome to try it to see it first hand.

The good thing about VHD files is that they can simply be moved to another location should you invest in some proper enterprise grade SAS drives.
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by:Philip Elder
ID: 40505548
Since Exchange 2013 is a lot more happy with RAM than disk (it was designed to run on a single 7200 RPM SATA disk) you should be okay with the 16GB assigned to that VM.

Note: Would, could, should. ;)

We've tested a lot of configurations and so far anything around 12GB and up seems to make Exchange 2013 happy.
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by:dougdog
ID: 40505565
great thanks for all the advice
much appreciated
should have been asking the question before making the purchase :(
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by:Philip Elder
ID: 40505634
The box should allow for more disks to be added?

You could always purchase four more disks, set up a RAID 6 array, configure Logical Disks on the RAID controller for the OS and Hyper-V files, and go from there. You'd get a better end user experience.

Is this box for lab, in-house use, or client facing?
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by:dougdog
ID: 40544146
client facing for 10 users
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by:Philip Elder
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For a lab setup two 7200 RPM SATA Disks would suffice though performance would really suck.

For a client facing setup? No way. Points mentioned in my blog post indicated above.

SAS is preferred. 10K 2.5" SAS gives great performance. Six of them in a RAID 6 array would give enough IOPS and throughput to work with 10 users unless they are hurtling CAD/CAM around all day. Then go for eight 10K SAS disks in RAID 6.
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