Powershell Strange Resulte

function daymonthyear ($product,$day)
{
$display = ""
if ($day -gt 0) {
    $years = [int]($day /365)
    $months = (($day - (365 * $years)) /30)
    if ($months -le 1) {$months =0}
    $days = [int]$day  - ((365 * $years) + ($months *30))
    $display=$product + "Will Expire in " 
    $display= $display + $years + "Years" 
    $display = $display + $months + " Months"
    $display = $display + $days + " Days"
   }
   else {
      $display = $product + " Has Expired"
    }
write-output($display)
}
clear
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 04 -day 08 -year 2014)
$product = "Windows XP"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 07 -day 14 -year 2015)
$product = "Windows Server 2003"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)
<#
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 04 -day 11 -year 2017)
$product = "Windows Vista"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)

$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 14 -year 2020)
$product = "Windows 7"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)

$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 09 -year 2023)
$product = "Windows 8"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 14 -year 2020)
$product = "Windows Server 2008"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 14 -year 2020)
$product = "Windows Server 2008R2"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)

$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 10 -year 2023)
$product = "Windows Server 2012"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 10 -year 2023)
$product = "Windows Server 2012R2"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)
#>

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Results:
Windows XP
-254
 Has Expired
Windows Server 2003
208
 Has Expired
LVL 87
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerAsked:
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footechCommented:
You're passing the arguments to the function incorrectly.  With the current code you're passing ($product,$ds.Days) as a single array to the $product variable of the function.  Instead call the function like this:
daymonthyear $product $ds.Days

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footechCommented:
Additionally, I think you can improve your function like this.
function daymonthyear ($product,$day)
{
    $display = ""
    if ($day -gt 0) {
        $years = [math]::Floor($day /365)
        $months = [math]::floor(($day - (365 * $years)) /30)
        $days = [int]$day  - ((365 * $years) + ($months *30))
        $display = "{0} Will Expire in`n {1} Years {2} Months {3} Days" -f $product,$years,$months,$days
    }
    else {
        $display = "{0} Has Expired" -f $product
    }
    Write-Output $display
}

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0
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerAuthor Commented:
added your idea
function daymonthyear ($product,$day)
{
Write-output("Product = " + $product + " Days=:" + $day)
$day = [int]$day
$display = ""
    if ($day -gt 0) {
        $years = [math]::Floor($day /365)
        $months = [math]::floor(($day - (365 * $years)) /30)
        $days = [int]$day  - ((365 * $years) + ($months *30))
        $display = "{0} Will Expire in`n {1} Years {2} Months {3} Days" -f $product,$years,$months,$days
    }
    else {
        $display = "{0} Has Expired" -f $product
    }
    Write-Output $display
}
clear
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 04 -day 08 -year 2014)
$product = "Windows XP"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 07 -day 14 -year 2015)
$product = "Windows Server 2003"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)

$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 04 -day 11 -year 2017)
$product = "Windows Vista"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)

$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 14 -year 2020)
$product = "Windows 7"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)

$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 09 -year 2023)
$product = "Windows 8"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 14 -year 2020)
$product = "Windows Server 2008"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 14 -year 2020)
$product = "Windows Server 2008R2"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 10 -year 2023)
$product = "Windows Server 2012"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 10 -year 2023)
$product = "Windows Server 2012R2"
daymonthyear($product,$ds.Days)

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added a line for debugging result=
Product = Windows XP -254 Days=:
Windows XP Has Expired
Product = Windows Server 2003 208 Days
Windows Server 2003 Has Expired
Product = Windows Vista 845 Days
Windows Vista Has Expired
Product = Windows 7 1853 Days
Windows 7 Has Expired
Product = Windows 8 2944 Days
Windows 8 Has Expired
Product = Windows Server 2008 1853 Days
Windows Server 2008 Has Expired
Product = Windows Server 2008R2 1853 Days
Windows Server 2008R2 Has Expired
Product = Windows Server 2012 2945 Days
Windows Server 2012 Has Expired
Product = Windows Server 2012R2 2945 Days
Windows Server 2012R2 Has Expired
0
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footechCommented:
You're still passing the arguments to the function incorrectly.  See my first post.  Substitute the code for line 20, 23, etc. in your last post.

Here's a good way of checking the contents of a variable - output it while surrounding it by visible characters.  It's a great way to see when it spans multiple lines, has whitespace at the beginning or end, etc.
function daymonthyear ($product,$day)
{
"`$product is ::$product::"
"`$day is ::$day::"
    $display = ""
    if ($day -gt 0) {
        $years = [math]::Floor($day /365)
        $months = [math]::floor(($day - (365 * $years)) /30)
        $days = [int]$day  - ((365 * $years) + ($months *30))
        $display = "{0} Will Expire in`n {1} Years {2} Months {3} Days" -f $product,$years,$months,$days
    }
    else {
        $display = "{0} Has Expired" -f $product
    }
    Write-Output $display
}

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0
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerAuthor Commented:
now it works Thank you I didn't realize that multiple variables are passed using a space as a deliminator

function daymonthyear ($product,$day)
{
$day = [int]$day
    $display = ""
    if ($day -gt 0) {
        $years = [math]::Floor($day /365)
        $months = [math]::floor(($day - (365 * $years)) /30)
        $days = [int]$day  - ((365 * $years) + ($months *30))
        $display = "{0} Will Expire in {1} Years {2} Months {3} Days" -f $product,$years,$months,$days
    }
    else {
        $display = "{0} Has Expired" -f $product
    }
    Write-Output $display
}

clear
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 04 -day 08 -year 2014)
$product = "Windows XP"
daymonthyear $product $ds.Days
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 07 -day 14 -year 2015)
$product = "Windows Server 2003"
daymonthyear $product $ds.Days

$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 04 -day 11 -year 2017)
$product = "Windows Vista"
daymonthyear $product $ds.Days

$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 14 -year 2020)
$product = "Windows 7"
daymonthyear $product $ds.Days

$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 09 -year 2023)
$product = "Windows 8"
daymonthyear $product $ds.Days
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 14 -year 2020)
$product = "Windows Server 2008"
daymonthyear $product $ds.Days
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 14 -year 2020)
$product = "Windows Server 2008R2"
daymonthyear $product $ds.Days

$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 10 -year 2023)
$product = "Windows Server 2012"
daymonthyear $product $ds.Days
$ds= New-TimeSpan $(Get-Date) $(Get-Date -month 01 -day 10 -year 2023)
$product = "Windows Server 2012R2"
daymonthyear $product $ds.Days

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0
footechCommented:
Glad I could help.

It may help to remember if you think of passing variables to functions the same way that you pass information for different parameters to a cmdlet.  In the case of a simple function the parameters are always by position (vs. named parameters).  Here's an example of a cmdlet with parameters by position.
Add-Content c:\temp\file.txt "line1","line2"

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0
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerAuthor Commented:
such is the problem when you are fluent in several languages you tend to use what you're used to..
0
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