Why does saving application settings in a C# application generate App.config.config?

I'm currently working out how to use the .net application settings infrastructure in C#. I've implemented a code snippet I received from: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms254494(v=vs.110).aspx

The code is as follows:
public void ToggleConfigEncryption(string exeConfigName)
        {
            // Takes the executable file name without the 
            // .config extension. 
            try
            {
                // Open the configuration file and retrieve  
                // the connectionStrings section.
                Configuration config = ConfigurationManager.
                    OpenExeConfiguration(exeConfigName);

                ConnectionStringsSection section =
                    config.GetSection("connectionStrings")
                    as ConnectionStringsSection;

                if (section.SectionInformation.IsProtected)
                {
                    // Remove encryption.
                    section.SectionInformation.UnprotectSection();
                }
                else
                {
                    // Encrypt the section.
                    section.SectionInformation.ProtectSection(
                        "DataProtectionConfigurationProvider");
                }
                // Save the current configuration.
                config.Save();

                Console.WriteLine("Protected={0}",
                    section.SectionInformation.IsProtected);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
            }
        }

Open in new window


The App.config looks like this:
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
    <configSections>
    </configSections>
    <startup> 
        <supportedRuntime version="v4.0" sku=".NETFramework,Version=v4.5" />
    </startup>
  <connectionStrings>
    <clear />
    <add name="SQL"
         providerName ="System.Data.SqlClient"
         connectionString ="Server=MyServer; Database=MyDB; User Id=sa; Password=Password;"/>
  </connectionStrings>
</configuration>

Open in new window


What I don't understand is why issuing the config.save(); command saves the application settings into the App.config.config file instead of the App.config file its self. Does anyone know why?
DonovanVAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Michael FowlerSolutions ConsultantCommented:
Are you sure you are passing in the exe name without the .config extension?

Place a break point on the code and check the value exeConfigName at runtime
0
DonovanVAuthor Commented:
Oops, I forgot to list my input. I've tested passing both "MyAppName.exe" and "App.config" into the ToggleConfigEncryption procedure. The result I described was from passing "App.config". When I pass "MyAppName.exe" into that procedure the result is a file named "MyAppName.exe.config". In both cases the connection string I'm trying to protect is left unencrypted in the App.config file.
0
Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
This is normal. App.config is part of your source code. It is not distributed with your application, so it does not need to be encrypted.

The one that you distribute with your application is the MyAppName.exe.config, so this is the one that needs to be encrypted. That is why you need to pass MyAppName.exe as a parameter, so that the MyAppName.exe.config file is the one that is encrypted.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Introducing Cloud Class® training courses

Tech changes fast. You can learn faster. That’s why we’re bringing professional training courses to Experts Exchange. With a subscription, you can access all the Cloud Class® courses to expand your education, prep for certifications, and get top-notch instructions.

Vikram Singh SainiSoftware Engineer cum AD DeveloperCommented:
I strongly agree with Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger).
0
Michael FowlerSolutions ConsultantCommented:
During testing the file being edited it located in the bin/Debug folder and as noted will be named MyAppName.exe.config
When you distribute the app you will need to ensure it is not encrypted as the encryption is machine specific and another machine will not have the appropriate keys needed to decrypt the string.
http://weblogs.asp.net/jongalloway/encrypting-passwords-in-a-net-app-config-file
0
DonovanVAuthor Commented:
Jacques cleared up the exact confusion I had about how this system was supposed to work. I think it is important however to point out that Michael74's answer is very important to the concept of encrypting and deploying settings. Now that I know how the system works I know that the way I was trying to implement it would not have been workable in the end without having un-encrypted settings deployed with the app then cleaned up later, at the very least.
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
C#

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.