Solved

Migration to Exchange 2013 SP1 - Edge Transport Role

Posted on 2014-12-19
6
304 Views
Last Modified: 2014-12-22
We're planning on moving to Exchange 2013 SP1. From all the information I could find, it seems that the Edge Transport role is to be placed in the perimeter network for incoming SMTP traffic. My question is, let's say the CAS role (along with the Mailbox Server role) resides on our internal network - do Outlook 2010/2013 users that connect to our organization from the outside do so through the Edge Transport server, or would they connect directly to our internal corporate LAN where the CAS is hosted?

And if they connect directly to out internal corporate LAN where our CAS is hosted, is there a way to force that traffic instead to go through the Edge Tranport server first, or would the CAS role also have to be installed on our perimeter network for this to work?

Basically, we would prefer that any traffic coming through the outside goes through our DMZ first. We would like to avoid having to open any port to our corporate LAN. I really appreciate any insight someone could offer into this. Thanks.

- Dave
0
Comment
Question by:glass81
6 Comments
 
LVL 15

Expert Comment

by:Ivan
Comment Utility
Hi,

as I know Edge is only there for SMTP flow, meaning that only email coming or going to your organization will go thru it.
Client connections for Outlook Anywhere, POP3, IMAP will go directly to CAS, so you would have to open SSL and any other required port.

Edge is not a part of AD domain, so it cannot authenticate clients. Clients are authenticated and then proxy from CAS to Mailbox.

Regards,
0
 

Author Comment

by:glass81
Comment Utility
So there's no way to accept connections for CAS from the edge transport server - kind of like routing all requests through there first? Maybe I'm off base here, but it sounds convenient to have port 443 open on the edge transport server as opposed to opening it directly on your internal corporate LAN.
0
 
LVL 63

Accepted Solution

by:
Simon Butler (Sembee) earned 500 total points
Comment Utility
Edge is a waste of money in my opinion, for exactly the reasons you have identified - it only does SMTP traffic. It has nothing to do with any other role. Therefore I never deploy one. I can achieve 90% of the functionality of Edge with third party products, and usually get more functionality that Edge cannot provide from those same products.

Most deployments I do will bring port 443 straight in to Exchange. Putting it through a DMZ does nothing for security. If you have a 1990s security policy that states nothing internal should be exposed to the internet, then use a separate server to do ARR.

The Exchange product team has outlined how to do that for Exchange 2013 here:
http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2013/07/19/reverse-proxy-for-exchange-server-2013-using-iis-arr-part-1.aspx

Also, I wouldn't be deploying Exchange 2013 SP1. That is very old now (effectively CU 4). New deployments should go straight to CU7. The cumulative updates are the complete product, so just download it from the public site, extract and install.

Simon.
0
How your wiki can always stay up-to-date

Quip doubles as a “living” wiki and a project management tool that evolves with your organization. As you finish projects in Quip, the work remains, easily accessible to all team members, new and old.
- Increase transparency
- Onboard new hires faster
- Access from mobile/offline

 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Gareth Gudger
Comment Utility
I agree with Simon. And if I could give him a +1 I would. ;)

There are a number of reverse proxies on the market. Many doing double duty as load balancers as well. ARR is a great free alternative from Microsoft. But it requires a server in the DMZ with IIS installed.
0
 

Author Comment

by:glass81
Comment Utility
Unfortunately Simon, we kind of do have that type of network. I understand that if our server hosting ARR is compromised in the DMZ, it would be just as bad as having our CAS compromised on our internal network.

I can't convince the IT Director otherwise, but I do appreciate the clarification, and ultimately, your help on this topic.
0
 
LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Gareth Gudger
Comment Utility
If they don't want to go with ARR, then you could look at a reverse proxy / load balancer like a KEMP.
http://kemptechnologies.com/solutions/reverse-proxy/

They offer them as hardware or virtual models.
0

Featured Post

What Is Threat Intelligence?

Threat intelligence is often discussed, but rarely understood. Starting with a precise definition, along with clear business goals, is essential.

Join & Write a Comment

Disabling the Directory Sync Service Account in Office 365 will stop directory synchronization from working.
Exchange server is not supported in any cloud-hosted platform (other than Azure with Azure Premium Storage).
In this video we show how to create an email address policy in Exchange 2013. We show this process by using the Exchange Admin Center. Log into Exchange Admin Center.:  First we need to log into the Exchange Admin Center. Navigate to the Mail Flow…
how to add IIS SMTP to handle application/Scanner relays into office 365.

743 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

19 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now