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Are there any problems converting an Access 2002 MDB to Access 13?

Posted on 2014-12-22
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Last Modified: 2014-12-22
I need a fresh look for my app.

Are there any problems converting an Access 2002 MDB to Access 13?
Can an app developed in 2013 be distributed with the relevant runtime (if it is still called that) without braking any rules?
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Question by:DatabaseDek
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE) earned 200 total points
ID: 40512886
The answer is, as it often is, "it depends".   A2013 depreciated a number of features, such as ADP's, Command Bars, dbf support (see https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Discontinued-features-and-modified-functionality-in-Access-2013-bc006fc3-5b48-499e-8c7d-9a2dfef68e2f?ui=en-US&rs=en-US&ad=US)

 If you don't use any of those, then no, there is no major changes except that A2013 is also the first version where you must live with the ribbon.

 Unlike 2010 and prior, which honored your menu bars, 2013 will not.  Instead it places them on a tab in the ribbon.    That more that anything you will have to deal with.

Also, if you convert to the the ACE format, you loose work group security.  Again not a biggie if you were not using it, o a major pain if you were as you will need to replace it.

Jim.
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LVL 58
ID: 40512890
BTW, from A2010 up, the other thing to watch out for is that Office comes in both 32 and 64 bit editions.

If you use no 3rd party controls, use Windows API calls, ODBC drivers, and distribute not as a MDE/ACCDE, then no problems.

If any of those are true, then you need to be aware of the differences.

 and note that 32 bit Office runs under 64 bit OS's; you don't need to use 64 bit under a 64 bit OS (In fact Microsoft is still  recommending 32 bit for the majority of users).  So the simplest thing to do is avoid 64 bit installs if you can.

Jim.
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Assisted Solution

by:PatHartman
PatHartman earned 150 total points
ID: 40513050
The Access runtime used to be very expensive but as of A2007, MS has been offering it as a free download.  Just be aware that installing an app on a computer that has just the Access runtime will result in security messages.  To make them go away permanently, you would need to update their registry to add the proper keys.  If this is an in-house app, your systems administrator can "push" the correct registry keys so you don't have to manually do it on each computer.  If the app is for external distribution or you don't have any way to push registry keys, then the simplest solution (although not cheap) is to purchase an installer such as SageKey which will handle installing the FE, BE, runtime, and registry keys along with anything else you need installed.
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Author Comment

by:DatabaseDek
ID: 40513185
Thank you both.

Can I run Access 2002 as well as 2019 on the same machine that I use for designing and developing access applications?

Derek
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Author Comment

by:DatabaseDek
ID: 40513187
Sorry that should have read Access 2010
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LVL 48

Assisted Solution

by:Dale Fye
Dale Fye earned 150 total points
ID: 40513202
If you want to do that, I would recommend doing it in a Virtual Machine, so that each of your versions of Office exist on different virtual machine.  This will prevent version conflicts from occurring.
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Author Closing Comment

by:DatabaseDek
ID: 40513269
Thank you all

Derek
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Expert Comment

by:Nick67
ID: 40513803
One other possible gotcha.
Access 2002 was the only version that had ADO as it's default library.
All others before and since had DAO as the default library.

Nothing may break out of the box, but switching the order of the libraries, or failing to preface all DAO items with syntax like DAO.Recordset may lead to unexpected results.  The recordsets of all objects like forms and reports are created with the highest priority library leading to forms and reports based on ADO recordsets.

With the ADO library as higher in priority than DAO, the RecordsetClone object does not have a .Bookmarkable property, for example.  Be aware that such oddities may occur, and don't let them stump you, and you will likely be okay.
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