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Motherboard doesn't support virtualization

Posted on 2014-12-24
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Last Modified: 2014-12-24
I've built a new system running Windows 10 Technical Preview and installed VirtualBox and found it won't start. When i've looked deeper into this, I found that my motherboard doesn't support hardware virtualization. Is this required for VirtualBox? I've tried enabling Hyper-V in windows and I get an error message saying "Hyper-V cannot be installed. Virtualization support is disabled in the firmware". Does this mean I cannot run any virtualization software unless I change the mobo? Or maybe there is a work-around which will allow me to get up and running?

When I looked in the bios, there was an option there for vt-d. I upgraded the bios and found they removed it. I found other forums saying that Asus never got it working.

Full System: Core I7-4790, ASUS Z97-A mobo, 16G Ram, Samsung 540 EVO ssd
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Question by:TownTalk
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by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE
ID: 40516654
I have an ASUS laptop that doesn't have hardware virtualization support and it runs VirtualBox fine. However, some guest OSes require it and maybe that's the issue with W10. In the list of VirtualBox's Guest OSes, you'll see that some of them say, "Requires VT-x or AMD-V hardware virtualization support." But others do not. I don't know about W10. Regards, Joe
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by:TownTalk
ID: 40516664
Thanks Joe, Which operating system are you running? When I try to start VirtualBox, nothing happens at all on the screen, but the following appears in the Application Event log:

Faulting application name: VirtualBox.exe, version: 0.0.0.0, time stamp: 0x54731167
Faulting module name: VirtualBox.exe, version: 0.0.0.0, time stamp: 0x54731167
Exception code: 0xc0000005
Fault offset: 0x0000000000015602
Faulting process ID: 0xc28
Faulting application start time: 0x01d01ec7376a29d7
Faulting application path: C:\Program Files\Oracle\VirtualBox\VirtualBox.exe
Faulting module path: C:\Program Files\Oracle\VirtualBox\VirtualBox.exe
Report ID: 75182e53-8aba-11e4-95ef-7824af891321
Faulting package full name:
Faulting package-relative application ID:

Is there anything in the above which points towards lack of virtualization support being the problem?
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by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE
ID: 40516695
My VirtualBox is running just Vista/32-bit. My VMware Player is running W95, W2k, XP, and Vista/32-bit on the same laptop. I recollect a statement on VMware Player that hardware virtualization is required for 64-bit guest OSes, but the VirtualBox shows some 64-bit OSes without that requirement. I don't see anything in the log that points to hardware virtualization support being the problem, but I don't consider myself to be a VirtualBox expert — just a happy user of it. I'm on Version 4.3.20 r96997. How about you? Regards, Joe
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by:rindi
ID: 40516755
VBox doesn't need hardware VT support, but it will only be able to install 32 bit guest OS's.

I find it strange that a new board with a core i7 CPU doesn't support VT. The CPU definitely does! I suggest you check your BIOS settings, as that VT support is practically always disabled by default. I'm sure your board has a setting in the BIOS where you can enable it.
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LVL 118
ID: 40516885
Intel VT is a combination of the CPU, BIOS and Motherboard combinations.

No Intel VT, No Hardware Assisted Virtualisation.

Older version of software did not require it.

e.g. VMware Player 2.0 or 3.0.
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rindi earned 500 total points
ID: 40516940
I've checked, the asus Z97 does support VT technologies. You just have to enable it in the BIOS (advanced, CPU options...).
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Author Closing Comment

by:TownTalk
ID: 40516988
Thanks Rindi!  Like I said in my original post, my bios used to have an item in CPU Options called VT-D. This disappeared when I updated the bios. So I thought that was the end of the story there. What I didn't realise is that a new option appeared lower down the advanced options: "Intel virtualisation technology". I enabled this and I found that I can get  Hyper-V working.

Virtual Box still doesn't still doesn't start though. It still faults and put an Event 1000 entry in the application log. I'm not too bothered now because I can use the Hyper-V which is built into Win 10.

Thanks for your help guys
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by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE
ID: 40516994
You're welcome. Glad to help. Happy Holidays! Regards, Joe
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by:rindi
ID: 40517006
A re-installation of the newest version VBox may have helped, but I agree, it is better to use Hyper-V when you can choose.
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