what is tcp and http

Posted on 2014-12-24
Medium Priority
Last Modified: 2015-02-16
I want to know what exactly is tcp and http.
As per my understanding we can make a tcp socket between two machines and send data from one machine to other using it.

Http can also be used to communicate with other machine and get response back.

Whats the difference between http and tcp.
If i want to host a service which fetches user some infirmation using http get request, can i do the same thing using tcp ?

When to use tcp and when to use http ?
Question by:Rohit Bajaj
LVL 84

Accepted Solution

Dave Baldwin earned 1000 total points
ID: 40517316
TCP is Transmission Control Protocol and HTTP is Hyper Text Transmission Protocol.  They are two of the many Internet Protocols.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transmission_Control_Protocol

TCP along with IP is used to connect sites to each other.  HTTP is used to deliver Hyper Text which is web pages from a server to a client.  HTTP does not run by itself but runs over TCP like many other protocols do like FTP.  TCP makes the logical connection but HTTP and FTP and the others are used to transfer data over a TCP connection.

At even more basic levels you have Ethernet and network cards and the other physical items that are used to physically connect one network point to another.
LVL 35

Expert Comment

by:Dan Craciun
ID: 40517384
>>When to use tcp and when to use http ?
You use tcp whenever you send data over a network (LAN, WAN, it does not matter).
You use http whenever you want to serve/receive a web page.


Expert Comment

by:Dilip Patidar
ID: 40517479

Please find the difference between TCP and HTTP..

LVL 57

Assisted Solution

giltjr earned 1000 total points
ID: 40517600
Think of networking as sending letters to people in the mail (a.k.a. snail mail).

UDP and TCP deal with the address on the outside of the envelope.  It has where it needs to go and where it came from.  

UDP is normal mail and TCP is when you request signed acknowledgement.  That is with UDP you have to assume it got to the destination.  TCP you get back something saying it got there.

HTTP is the "language" that the letter is written in and there are different "languages": FTP, SMTP, DNS, SSH, ect.

On top of that each "language" may have their own form of "grammar".  HTTP has different versions HTML as an example.

Author Comment

by:Rohit Bajaj
ID: 40565980
didnt got time to look at the posts. will look at it today or tomorow and close it if no further questions
thanks everyone

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