Old server

Hi,

I have two old servers, acer altos g530 and ibm xseries 226. They were used in business environment and they are no longer in need.

Any ideas what you would use this server for? or should I just destroy them?
EducadAsked:
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
They look old enough to be of no useful value. Remove the hard drives, send the carcasses to recycle and dispose of the drives separately. Drilling a hole through them is easy and effective.
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rindiCommented:
They aren't that old to be of no use. If you can't find anything to use them for I'd try selling them via ebay or a similar portal.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I put servers of that vintage in service nearly 10 years ago at clients and they were not of any use there. Still, if someone on eBay will purchase them, it may be worth your while.
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EducadAuthor Commented:
Can they be used as home lab servers for Hyper-v virtualization practice?
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I did some looking and those servers (to the best of my knowledge) do not support Hyper-V. Someone got Server 2008 running on one.

Take one home and experiment. I still think the servers are past it.
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rindiCommented:
Hyper-V and VMware ESXi should work. They both use at least dual core xeons, and most of those support VT. You'd just have to make sure that that option is enabled in the BIOS (usually it isn't by default). But you'd need enough RAM and disk space to make it worth it.
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dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?Commented:
No virtualization (VT) on those processors - at least on the Xeon in the Acer Altos and most likely on the IBM as well.  So Hyper-V won't work.

Sell as rindi suggests or maybe make them into simple file servers for users who need to share files.
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nobusCommented:
take also into consideration the power consumption and noise
older models use a LOT of power, compared to modern ones, and make a lot of noise also, meaning you probably need to set them up in a separate "server" room
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
@Educad - Thanks and I was happy to help
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