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marrowyung

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reserve keyword for PL/SQL when oracle migrate from 10gR2/11gR2 to 12c

Dear alll,

right now going to migrate from 10gR2/11gR2 to 12c, other than setup a POC and test it, any list of reserved PL/SQL keyword for 10gR2/11gR2 to 12c so that developer can check more on their code before switch over?
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marrowyung
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Naveen Kumar
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marrowyung

ASKER

so you never upgrade to 12c?
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Naveen Kumar
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not yet mate. But the best thing is to upgrade as per the dates of obsolescence given by the oracle product vendor for the current versions.
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marrowyung

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I am still concerning about the reserver keyword for oracle aplication after it is migrate to 12c.

anything more you can provide?
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Sean Stuber

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marrowyung

ASKER

oh, that one is your new 12.1.0.2 installation ?
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marrowyung

ASKER

the point is we don't have 12c installed  yet !

one thing, I see a lot of N in the reserved column, it means nothing has reserved and all PL/SQL has to change?
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Sean Stuber

yes, these are from my 12.1.0.2 install, since you don't have it installed, I generated the list for you.

If it's on the reserved list, then it's still recommended you don't use it.  But the flags indicate if it will generate an error when used in the various ways..

from the Reference manual:
http://docs.oracle.com/database/121/REFRN/refrn30204.htm#REFRN30204

RESERVED       Indicates whether the keyword cannot be used as an identifier (Y) or whether the keyword is not reserved (N)

RES_TYPE       Indicates whether the keyword cannot be used as a type name (Y) or whether the keyword is not reserved (N)

RES_ATTR       Indicates whether the keyword cannot be used as an attribute name (Y) or whether the keyword is not reserved (N)

RES_SEMI       Indicates whether the keyword is not allowed as an identifier in certain situations, such as in DML (Y) or whether the keyword is not reserved (N)

DUPLICATE       Indicates whether the keyword is a duplicate of another keyword (Y) or whether the keyword is not a duplicate (N)
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marrowyung

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"If it's on the reserved list, then it's still recommended you don't use it.  But the flags indicate if it will generate an error when used in the various ways.."

wait, on the list means it can be use and which is not in the list should not be used ?
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marrowyung

ASKER

or just because nearly all output from that query is 'N', so we don't recommended to  use it?
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Sean Stuber

"wait, on the list means it can be use and which is not in the list should not be used ? "

no

If it's on the reserved list, then it's recommended you do NOT use it.  Regardless of the flags.

The flags indicate if you'll get an error
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marrowyung

ASKER

"If it's on the reserved list, then it's recommended you do NOT use it.  Regardless of the flags."

so that's why it called reserved keyword? reserved for old PL/SQL only?
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Sean Stuber

so that's why it called reserved keyword?

yes

 reserved for old PL/SQL only?

no
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Sean Stuber

>> what else?

whatever Oracle wants, but the flags are indicators


you're over thinking this.
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marrowyung

ASKER

"you're over thinking this. "

I agree!
hahha
Oracle Database
Oracle Database

Oracle is an object-relational database management system. It supports a large number of languages and application development frameworks. Its primary languages are SQL, PL/SQL and Java, but it also includes support for C and C++. Oracle also has its own enterprise modules and application server software.

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