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Active Directory 2003 to 2008 upgrade 003 to 2008

Posted on 2014-12-30
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Last Modified: 2014-12-31
I have a 2003 Active Directory Domain with one Domain Controller and several windows 2003 servers (SQL, File Servers....).  I have also Introduced 2 2008 R2 servers to the domain.  I do not have exchange.

I need direction on upgrading from 2003 AD to 2008 AD.  The two 2008 R2 servers will be the domain controllers and the 2003 AD server will be retired.  Other Windows 2003 servers will remain in the domain.

Thanks for your help.

Bill
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Question by:bilalaha
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it_saige earned 500 total points
ID: 40524521
In a nutshell:

When you introduce your first 2008 R2 server to the domain as a domain controller, you will need to run ADPREP32 (found in the Support\Adprep directory on the 2008 R2 media) on your current 2003 domain controller.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd464018(v=ws.10).aspx

After you successfully run ADPREP, then you can run DCPROMO on the 2008 R2 server.  Once you do that and verify that Active Directory is replicating properly, you can introduce your second 2008 R2 server as a domain controller (no need to run adprep a second time, it only needs to be ran once).

Other considerations include non-active directory integrated services, such as DHCP and Time.  You want to make sure that you implement the time services properly on the DC that you will have hold the PDC Emulator FSMO role.

After you retire the current DC (by using DCPROMO to demote it).  You can then consider changing the Forest and Domain Functional Levels.
http://technet.microsoft.com/library/understanding-active-directory-functional-levels(WS.10).aspx

-saige-
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by:bilalaha
ID: 40525516
Thank you for the information and the links.  It great.

Will there be down time, and how long?  Roughly speaking.  I have a small domain with less than 50 workstations, but operate 24/7.  I may me able to schedule a short downtime, but not long.

Thanks,

Bill
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Assisted Solution

by:it_saige
it_saige earned 500 total points
ID: 40525531
There should be no downtime to speak of as replication happens online.  The only place where there may be what is considered downtime; is in the migration of the DHCP database from the old server to the new one.  This is not true downtime as anyone who already has an ip address will continue along normally (unless their ip address lease time expires and generates a request for a new ip).  All in all though, the migration of DHCP is not really a time intensive procedure so their downtime, if any, would be a matter of minutes.

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/7411.step-by-step-migration-dhcp-from-windows-server-2003-to-windows-server-2008-r2-with-windows-server-migration-tools.aspx

-saige-
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LVL 2

Author Closing Comment

by:bilalaha
ID: 40525572
Thanks you.  I will install DHCP and DNS roles on the new domain controller, give half of the current scope to the new DC and keep half on the old until I demote.  This way I will not have downtime.

Thank you again.
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