Solved

When did INI files in the C:\Windows folder become bad practice?

Posted on 2014-12-30
6
122 Views
Last Modified: 2015-01-15
Back in the Windows 3.1 days, programs would store configuration data in .INI files stored in the C:\Windows folder.

Nowadays, of course, this isn't a good idea anymore and it is surpassed by newer technologies like the Registry, and saving data in the user's AppData folder. For lots and lots of good reasons.

Is there a SPECIFIC Microsoft reference article or KB article that discusses this change in best practices, or some other kind of documentation I can point at to say when this shift in thinking occured on Microsoft's part? Maybe some kind of "introduction to the Registry" document from '95?

I'm trying to convince a stubborn vendor to update their software.
0
Comment
Question by:Frosty555
6 Comments
 
LVL 11

Assisted Solution

by:andreas
andreas earned 250 total points
ID: 40524658
0
 
LVL 1

Accepted Solution

by:
goldied earned 250 total points
ID: 40524678
Hey, just Google for user account control. I've worked for a software vendor and anything that has to write to the c: drive in system folders or even in its own root folder will fail.

This is the reason for what was originally dubbed windows logo certification. Your vendor needs to become Microsoft certified in order to be fully compliant.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/windows/desktop/dd371701%28v=vs.85%29.aspx
0
 
LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:dbrunton
ID: 40524870
Probably Windows NT introduced the idea of using the Registry rather than ini files.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Registry#Virtualization

If you read the article it DOES NOT mean that Windows will take care of the ini problem.
0
DevOps Toolchain Recommendations

Read this Gartner Research Note and discover how your IT organization can automate and optimize DevOps processes using a toolchain architecture.

 
LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:BillDL
ID: 40525498
An interesting question was posed here:
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2006/02/22/536920.aspx#536935
and it led to the posting of a pros vs cons blog entry here:
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2007/11/26/6523907.aspx

It all depends on the complexity of the "program".  It would be practically impossible to store all the configuration data for an application suite like Microsoft Office in INI or XML-based config files, but for programs like IrfanView image editor, CCleaner, and so on, I see no compelling reason why the program settings should not be stored in an INI file in the program's own folder.
0
 
LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:andreas
ID: 40525509
under win vista and up the c:\program files cannot be writteen to without admin rights. files wirtten with user rights end up in the profile folder of the user in some shadow directories, so the settings apply only rto this user created the file. if a file already persistent in the folder from installation and needs to be modified im not sure if a copy will go to the shadow dir or if it only can be modified with admin access. Thus putting files to the programs folder is laso no good way.
0
 
LVL 69

Expert Comment

by:Éric Moreau
ID: 40525527
I wouldn't agree that the registry is a better option over config files. When programming in .Net, you are encouraged to use App.Config files (a kind of INI file XML formatted) as one is already created when creating a new project.
0

Featured Post

Is Your Active Directory as Secure as You Think?

More than 75% of all records are compromised because of the loss or theft of a privileged credential. Experts have been exploring Active Directory infrastructure to identify key threats and establish best practices for keeping data safe. Attend this month’s webinar to learn more.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

If you need to start windows update installation remotely or as a scheduled task you will find this very helpful.
In this article, I will show you HOW TO: Install VMware Tools for Windows on a VMware Windows virtual machine on a VMware vSphere Hypervisor 6.5 (ESXi 6.5) Host Server, using the VMware Host Client. The virtual machine has Windows Server 2016 instal…
Windows 8 comes with a dramatically different user interface known as Metro. Notably missing from the new interface is a Start button and Start Menu. Many users do not like it, much preferring the interface of earlier versions — Windows 7, Windows X…
Viewers will learn how to properly install Eclipse with the necessary JDK, and will take a look at an introductory Java program. Download Eclipse installation zip file: Extract files from zip file: Download and install JDK 8: Open Eclipse and …

895 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

15 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now