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Redirection of web service request for data

I have a commercial program that used to fetch data from the Internet on request.  Unfortunately, the service that it accessed is no longer available, and the program isn't updated to use a different service, even though the data itself is available from a number of sources on the Internet.

I have in mind to write a Windows service that would receive the data request (I can either patch the program to send the request to 127.0.0.1 or force DNS to return this address), would then fetch the data from a different server, manipulate it if necessary, and then return it to the original requestor.  I'll need something that listens on a TCP port, but beyond that I've little idea of the best approach.

I'm thinking of this very generally, but in case it helps, the program is the Quicken money management program (UK version which has been dropped), and the data concerned is stock prices.

Does anyone have any suggestions?  Thanks.
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Tony Pitt
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Tony Pitt
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1 Solution
 
Aaron TomoskyTechnology ConsultantCommented:
If you can figure out the DNS entry, you can add it to your hosts file to redirect it.
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Tony PittAuthor Commented:
Thanks, Aaron.  I can do that bit without problem.  What I'm completely stuck on is what I need to write and run on my local computer to receive the request, to get the data from somewhere else, and then to return it to Quicken.  I need a program, probably a service, listening on the appropriate TCP port, but beyond that I have no idea.

/T
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Aaron TomoskyTechnology ConsultantCommented:
Start be downloading fiddler and looking at the request and response. If you can send this request to another url and get the same response, then you can get by with just a reverse proxy. If you need to mess with it, you need something written in whatever language you are familiar with (.net, ruby, php, Python, etc...) that will get the content, mess with it, and return it.
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Tony PittAuthor Commented:
Thanks, Aaron Tomosky.  I wasn't aware of fiddler, but have now used it to get me started.
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