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I am getting a 32-bit file error when saving my Acces 2013 .accde file

Posted on 2014-12-31
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Last Modified: 2015-01-03
Hi Experts,
I have an Access database that I started in Access 2013 (installed on my laptop).  I then modified and in an Access 2010 install (on my desktop).  I saved it as an .accde file on my desktop and then sent the file to a client who is running Access 2013 on their machine.  When they try to open the .accde file, they get a message saying the file is a 32-bit file, and were not able to open the file.   \

I tried fixing the issue by opening the Access database in my laptop that has Access 2013 installed, then saving the file as .accde file.  I resent the newly saved .accde file to my client, but they still are not able to open the file because the file still shows it is a 32-bit file.  What am I doing wrong?  How can I fix this?  Please help.  

Thank you very much.
mrotor
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Question by:mainrotor
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5 Comments
 
LVL 58
ID: 40526506
The problem is that your Office install is 32 bit, while they have the 64 bit edition of Office.

Options:
1. They un-install the 64 bit edition and install the 32 bit edition - this is the best for them and you.   Microsoft still recommends the 32 bit edition for users over the 64 bit because of the lack of 64 bit software and that there are only a few advantages to the 64 bit edition

2. You don't distribute as a accde, but as a accdb   That let's the DB run assuming your doing no API calls, using 3rd part DLL's or controls, or ODBC calls.

3. You have them install the A2010 runtime in 32 bit, and send them a A2010 accde.

4. You create the accde in the 64 bit edition of office.

Jim.
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Author Comment

by:mainrotor
ID: 40527221
Jim,
Thanks for your feedback.  If I distribute the the application as an accdb, would my client then be able to create/save the accde themselves (as a 64 bit accde) ?

I use ADO in my application, will this be a problem.

One more question:
I have Office 2007 on my machine (Word,Excel, etc..), but my copy of Access is 2013.  Why won't my Access 2013 apps save as a 64 bit?  Do I have to also purchase Office 2013 in order to be able to create 64 bit apps?

Thank you,
mrotor
0
 
LVL 58
ID: 40527661
Thanks for your feedback.  If I distribute the the application as an accdb, would my client then be able to create/save the accde themselves (as a 64 bit accde) ?

  Yes, but why would they bother?   The point of distributing as a accde is to protect the source code.   Since your already handing them a .accdb, they have it.  If your not worried about protecting the code, then there is no reason to distribute as a .accde

I use ADO in my application, will this be a problem.

No.


I have Office 2007 on my machine (Word,Excel, etc..), but my copy of Access is 2013.  Why won't my Access 2013 apps save as a 64 bit?  Do I have to also purchase Office 2013 in order to be able to create 64 bit apps?

Because you installed Access 2013 32 bit.  From Office 2010 and up, Office comes in two editions; 32 and 64 bit.  Within a single version, all components must be the same (You can't have Excel 2013 in 32 bit and Access 2013 in 64).

You are better off at this time with 32 bit.

Jim.
0
 

Author Comment

by:mainrotor
ID: 40528375
Jim.
Thank you once again.  You have been very helpful.

I just have a few more questions:
1) If I purchase Office 2013, do I have to get the Home and business version, or will I be okay purchasing the Home and student version?  (If I want to be able to create 64-bit .accde files)

2) I have Visual Studio 2010, and SQL Server 2012 on my machine.  Will they prevent me from creating 64-bit .accde files even after purchasing Office 2013?


***Various users will be using the application.  I want to be able to provide my client with .accde files, so that the users don't mess with the VBA code.


mrotor
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LVL 58

Accepted Solution

by:
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE) earned 500 total points
ID: 40528466
1) If I purchase Office 2013, do I have to get the Home and business version, or will I be okay purchasing the Home and student version?  (If I want to be able to create 64-bit .accde files)

 Neither.   Only the professional edition comes with Access and you can buy that in either 32 or 64 bit.  

 If your talking Office 365 (a subscription), then Office 365 Home is what you want as it includes Access.

2) I have Visual Studio 2010, and SQL Server 2012 on my machine.  Will they prevent me from creating 64-bit .accde files even after purchasing Office 2013?

 No.  It's the "bitness" of Office that you have installed that determines what an accde ends up as.

 If you have 64 bit office installed, once you distribute a accde, only 64 bit Office users will be able to use it.  Likewise, if you have 32 bit office installed, only 32 bit office users will be able to the accde.

 You only can support both 32 and 64 bit Office installs with a single  if you distribute as a accdb and follow certain coding practices.

***Various users will be using the application.  I want to be able to provide my client with .accde files, so that the users don't mess with the VBA code.

If your going to stick to distributing accde's, then you will need two machines, or one machine with an additional virtual machine for a second install of Office.

 Most of what you'll find out there is 32 bit Office.   64 bit is not in widespread use and even now, Microsoft still recommends 32 bit installs for the majority of users.

Jim.
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