VMKernel Role

***on the 1st snapshot below, I see standard Virtual switch, and Vmnic connected to it on the right, on the left I see VM machine port group and below it Vmkernel port groups.
I would like to know if VM machines (VM Network)traffic goes through Vmkernel then through Vmnic to reach end users and back ?

I see one link goes from Vmnic to VM Machines port group and another link goes from Vmnic to Vmkernel. That's a bit confusing to understand which traffic goes from Vmnic to Vmkernel to VM machines and which traffic goes from Vmnic directly to VM machines.

traffic
***on the second snapshot , It says vmkernel handles traffic for Vmotion, ISCSI, NFS , FCoE, Fault Tolearnce,Virual SAN, Host Management.
I would like to know if all the above mentioned traffic comes in through Vmnic then goes to  Vmkernel which in turn routes to VM machines , then back ?
Or There is some traffic that does not go out of vmnic and back ? just between VM Machines port group and VM kernel ?

Any help will be very much appreciated.

 ker
jskfanAsked:
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)Connect With a Mentor VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
That is correct!.

they all have different IP Addresses!

(yes, it's switched via the Virtual Switch - vSwitch!).
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)Connect With a Mentor VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
The VMKernel Portgroup is in the "hypervisor", so network traffic is communicating with the Hypervisor, e.g. the ESXi OS.

A VMKernel Portgroup has IP Addresses, so traffic knows where to go.

A Virtual Machine Portgroup has no IP Address, but the Virtual Machines have IP Addresses, to where traffic is relayed.

e.g. VMKernel IP Address - 10.10.1.1

Virtual Machine IP Address - 172.16.254.2

Network traffic can only got to one of the addresses.
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
On the first diagram above, which route the traffic takes from VM machine to get out of vmnic and back to VM machines ?
you can notice there is a yellow link that goes from vmnic to VMNetwork(Vmmachine), and a gray link that goes from Vmnic to VmKernel.
I am sure there is traffic going between vmkernel and vmnetwork, but there is no link shown in the diagram above.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)Connect With a Mentor VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
if you have an IP Address of   10.10.1.1 [VMKernel ] and an IP Address of 172.16.254.2 [VM]

How can traffic reach the VM, destined for the VMKernel and vice versa ?

(the hypervisor can communicate with the VM directly!)

http://pubs.vmware.com/vmci-sdk/
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gheistConnect With a Mentor Commented:
vmware virtual switch is a software defined virtual switch. If virtual machine is in same host connected to same switch traffic will never exit on wire.
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phil435Connect With a Mentor Commented:
The guest OS's will not use vmkernel ports for their network traffic. You create a vswitch, portgrouos,associate it to vlans, and then physical adapters. The guest use will be assigned to one of the portgroups that you created.

Vmkernel ports are used to assign an IP address to the host and for special purposes such as vmotion, ft, managmemt traffic iSCSI. See this link:
http://www.pearsonitcertification.com/articles/article.aspx?p=2190191&seqNum=10
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
OK... Let me make sure I  understand what you are saying.

***VM Machines do not communicate with Vmkernel, their traffic goes straight through Vmnic(physical adapter)

***VMkernel does not communicate with VM Machines. its traffic goes straight through Vmnic(Physical Adapter).

Correct ?
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jskfanAuthor Commented:
Thank you Guys!
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