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RAID Problem

Posted on 2015-01-05
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Last Modified: 2016-12-08
Hi

I run a Lenovo RD240 server with megaraid comtroller. I had to change two defective hard disks. Now the array is in Background Init state and the server doesn't boot. No system on drive C:

Do I have to wait until the rebuild is over?

Thank you
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Question by:jpmoreau
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by:David Paris Vicente
ID: 40532168
What kind of Raid do you have in place?
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by:jpmoreau
ID: 40532174
It is a RAID 5 with 8 physical disks
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by:Glenn M
ID: 40532186
There was a firmware update for some Megaraid adapters that fixed a problem with the logical drive reporting that they were in background init state even thought the logical drives are not really in background init state. Check your controller version and there's a tech note at Driver Guide
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by:jpmoreau
ID: 40532196
Is it supposed to fix my ''No System disk on boot?''
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by:Glenn M
ID: 40532254
Not sure on that as the system where we ran into that wasn't having the boot disk issue.

I'd make sure the controller is OK (built-in diagnostic or mfg utility) before you do anything.
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by:Joeteck
ID: 40532256
In a RAID 5 array, you can only lose one drive and still function. If two died at the sametime you're done. Dead in the water.

Food for thought, never make the boot drive part of the same RAID array as your DATA.

Mirrored drives for boot. And RAID 5, 6, or 10 for your DATA. This way all your eggs are not in one basket.

Hope you have an image of your system..
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by:Seth Simmons
ID: 40532260
I had to change two defective hard disks.

were both failed or changed at the same time?
raid 5 can survive only one failure at a time
background init sounds like it is creating a new array; i would expect the status to be 'rebuild' on the replaced disk
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Author Comment

by:jpmoreau
ID: 40532262
Even if I have a RAID containing 8 drives?
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by:jpmoreau
ID: 40532269
Failed at the same time.

I changed both
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by:Joeteck
ID: 40532271
Yes... still only have 1 drive as the parity bit.. Unless the other one was a hot spare... but I doubt it..

I found this little blurb for you. Read it carefully..

RAID 5 is by far the most common RAID configuration for business servers and enterprise NAS devices. This RAID level provides better performance than mirroring as well as fault tolerance. With RAID 5, data and parity (which is additional data used for recovery) are striped across three or more disks. If a disk gets an error or starts to fail, data is recreated from this distributed data and parity block— seamlessly and automatically. Essentially, the system is still operational even when one disk kicks the bucket and until you can replace the failed drive. Another benefit of RAID 5 is that it allows many NAS and server drives to be "hot-swappable" meaning in case a drive in the array fails, that drive can be swapped with a new drive without shutting down the server or NAS and without having to interrupt users who may be accessing the server or NAS. It's a great solution for fault tolerance because as drives fail (and they eventually will), the data can be rebuilt to new disks as failing disks are replaced. The downside to RAID 5 is the performance hit to servers that perform a lot of write operations. For example, with RAID 5 on a server that has a database that many employees access in a workday, there could be noticeable lag.

RAID 6 is also used frequently in enterprises. It's identical to RAID 5, except it's an even more robust solution because it uses one more parity block than RAID 5. You can have two disks die and still have a system be operational.
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by:Seth Simmons
ID: 40532283
Even if I have a RAID containing 8 drives?

the number of drives (>=3) is irrelevant
one drive is parity which allows for one drive failure
you experienced a double fault which fails the array
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by:Joeteck
ID: 40532288
I would as an experiment, to be sure both drives are in fact dead. I would install one of the failed drives back in the system. It may still be good enough to boot. If so, you'll be in a failed state but functioning..  I would then install one of the new drives, and start the rebuild process. If successful, then remove the other bad drive and replace it with another new drive,  and start the rebuild process again...
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by:Seth Simmons
ID: 40532306
too late for that; he said the process is in background init so it sounds like he created a new array and the controller is initializing it
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by:Joeteck
ID: 40532307
That really stinks... Sorry buddy...
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by:jpmoreau
ID: 40532391
Should I import the foreign configuration he find on the controller?
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by:Seth Simmons
ID: 40532570
wait...you were doing background init
where is it asking you about foreign config?  what did you do?
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Joeteck earned 500 total points
ID: 40532586
Does not matter.. all posts are moot at this point.. the data is gone.
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by:Gerald Connolly
ID: 40533466
RAID-5 might be the most common form of RAID, but is now not recommended for the current crop of v.large spindle sizes due to the Risk Exposure of the excessive rebuild times. RAID10 & RAID-6 recommended as replacements
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