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Move 2008 terminal server from domain to new 2012 domain

Posted on 2015-01-06
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Last Modified: 2015-01-12
Hey Guys,
I got a couple of 2008 terminal servers in a 2008 domain I want to move to a new domain, so that I dont have to reinstall the servers, because they contain a lot of programs and settings, that will take time and cost a lot of money to configure from scratch.

The problem is that the new domain is set to 2012 servers only... can I somehow change that so I can have the 2008 servers in there as well ? And how do I move the servers and users so I can keep it as simple as possible ?
I have never moved a server from one domain to another before... I used to reinstall the servers from scratch, but these servers is too heavy, so I'm looking for a easy solution. (Nothing is easy... I know :-) )

Hope some of you have some ideas and suggestion.
Thanks.
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Question by:Jesper Andersen
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by:it_saige
it_saige earned 750 total points
ID: 40533499
How is your new domain set to 2012 servers only?  Are you referring to the Forest/Domain Functional Levels?

If this is what you are referring to then you might be misunderstanding the settings.  The Forest/Domain functional levels *only* define the minimum operating system of the Domain Controllers, not member servers.  As I assume your terminal servers are member servers, there will be no problem moving them to the new domain.
Functional levels determine the available Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) domain or forest capabilities.  They also determine which Windows Server operating systems you can run on domain controllers in the domain or forest. However, functional levels do not affect which operating systems you can run on workstations and member servers that are joined to the domain or forest.
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-saige-
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VB ITS earned 750 total points
ID: 40533704
The problem is that the new domain is set to 2012 servers only... can I somehow change that so I can have the 2008 servers in there as well ?
Not sure what you mean by this. If you're referring to the domain and forest functional levels then that only really affects the version of Windows installed on Domain Controllers and not Terminal Servers.

For example. if your forest and domain functional levels have been raised to Server 2012 then you can only have Domain Controllers running Windows Server 2012 or Windows Server 2012 R2. Any other server running previous versions of Windows won't be able to be promoted to a DC. This doesn't mean that you can't have Server 2003 or 2008 as member servers though. See this article for more information: http://technet.microsoft.com/library/understanding-active-directory-functional-levels(WS.10).aspx

And how do I move the servers and users so I can keep it as simple as possible?
When you move the Terminal Servers to the new domain, you shouldn't have any issues with the current programs installed unless one or more of those programs rely on databases stored on a different server.

The main problem here will be the user profiles. When you recreate the user accounts on the new domain, they will be given different SIDs. As profiles are connected to SIDs  you will find that when the users log into the Terminal Servers with their recreated accounts they will get brand new profiles. You can try the steps in this article to migrate user profiles manually but you may run into niggling issues down the track.

I would recommend just copying over each user's relevant data (Desktop, Documents, Outlook signature, etc.) and give them a new profile from scratch.
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by:Jesper Andersen
ID: 40544090
Hello guys,
Thanks for the suggestions... I had the forest functional levels mixed up, and I will give it a shot. THanks.
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