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Disk management displays correct disk size, but the incorrect volume size.

Posted on 2015-01-06
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Last Modified: 2015-01-12
I have numerous Virtual Servers running Windows 20012 Standard within my vSphere environment. I have recently converted all my storage to a new SAN that I have created and presented NFS shares and mounted on vCenter esxi hosts. I have carved out multiple thin provisioned volumes for each of these server. I have one of these servers that has 4 VMDK Disks with a total of 5 partitions. The VMDK Disk show the correct size in, but two of the volumes show up as 500MB partitions, but they should be 300GB and 310GB in size given the the partition on these two disks occupies the full size.

I have attached a screen shot of Disk Management with the Disks at top, and the volumes at the bottom.
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Question by:D91Admin
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17 Comments
 
LVL 35

Expert Comment

by:Seth Simmons
ID: 40534362
there is no attachment
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LVL 120
ID: 40534521
So the OS partitons in the VMDK are not the same size as the VMDK ?
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Expert Comment

by:noxcho
ID: 40535116
Could be that PartMgr in Windows of the guest machine got screwed. Help it. In Windows Disk Management shrink a volume for 20-50MB. Then extend it again. See if it shows the correct size now.
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Author Comment

by:D91Admin
ID: 40536032
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Expert Comment

by:Seth Simmons
ID: 40536073
can you show the other part as to what volumes are on what disks?
a bit of a guessing game with that screenshot
guessing that disk 0 has C; hard to tell what disk D and E are on; T is probably disk 2 but the full display of disks and volumes would help
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Author Comment

by:D91Admin
ID: 40536096
Seth: there is no attachment
Just re-uploaded the screen shot. :)

Andrew: So the OS partitons in the VMDK are not the same size as the VMDK ?

On the two disks that show the incorrect size, the VMDK files are Thin Provisioned to 310GB (Disk 1) and 300GB (Disk 3), and the volume partition is extended to the full size of the vmdk.

The OS disk shows correct in size, and has two separate partitions, one for the OS, and the other is the recovery partition that windows creates automatically on install.

noxcho: Could be that PartMgr in Windows of the guest machine got screwed. Help it. In Windows Disk Management shrink a volume for 20-50MB. Then extend it again. See if it shows the correct size now.

I tried this as per your suggestion with no luck, drive still shows the capacity as 500MB instead of 300 or 310GB. :(

I have found a work around, I have created a new vmdk on the server, and I am using robocopy to migrate my files to the new volume. The new volume displays the disk and volume size correctly.
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LVL 35

Expert Comment

by:Seth Simmons
ID: 40536123
...and the volume partition is extended to the full size of the vmdk.

there is no 310gb or 300gb volume listed in that screenshot
almost as if there are no volumes there
again, showing the graphical part of disk management would be a huge help
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Author Comment

by:D91Admin
ID: 40536134
So the Disk to Volume mapping is:
Disk 0 = (C:) and System Reserved
Disk 1 = Desktops (D:)
Disk 2 = VSS (T:)
Disk 3 = DskTp/MyDocs (E:)
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Expert Comment

by:Seth Simmons
ID: 40536146
D and E are 500mb each
you said the volume is extended to the full size of the virtual disks that are 300gb and 310gb
again, there is no volume listed of that size meaning they are not extended to the full size of the disk
right-click the volume and select extend
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Author Comment

by:D91Admin
ID: 40536155
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Author Comment

by:D91Admin
ID: 40536170
Seth,

Now you see the heart of the problem, hopefully the graphical view will demonstrate that the volumes are already extended to the full size of the VMDK, it just doesn't show it correctly in the volume view. Also in windows explorer the volume show them as only 500MB in size when realy they are much bigger, and each has far more then 500MB of data stored on them. :|
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LVL 35

Expert Comment

by:Seth Simmons
ID: 40536185
were the volumes initially 500mb and were extended or originally created as 300gb?
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Accepted Solution

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D91Admin earned 0 total points
ID: 40536230
I have verified that the workaround of creating a new volume and then migrating the data fixes my issue, so I am going to migrate the data in off hours.

The biggest reason I needed to fix this, is because Windows explorer also showed these volumes as having only 500MB as well, when in fact they each have over 200Gig of data on them. This created a big issue when I wanted to see exactly how much free space was on these disks. I believe that noxcho might have been right about the PartMgr being screwed up on the local machine, so creating new volumes gets me around the issue.
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Author Comment

by:D91Admin
ID: 40536242
Seth: were the volumes initially 500mb and were extended or originally created as 300gb?

No, neither of them were ever created at 500MB. I believe this problem surfaced during a migration to a new SAN last year. The migration was from Raw disk mappings to VMDK on nfs shares. I don't recall the specifics on how this server was migrated. As far as I know it is the only server out of more than 40 that were migrated that displayed this issue.
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Author Comment

by:D91Admin
ID: 40536257
If I am going to use my own work around, how should I disperse the points?
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LVL 120
ID: 40536282
If none of the solutions helped, and you used your solution, you pick your solution as the Answer!
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Author Closing Comment

by:D91Admin
ID: 40544012
My workaround was the only way I identified to achieve the results needed.
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