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Excel conditional format question

Posted on 2015-01-09
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Last Modified: 2015-01-16
I have a sheet with a column that has emails.  Some emails are duplicate and some are BLUE.

I need to make a condition or formula that satisfies this.

If an email text is BLUE, find any duplicate emails of that same email and make them BLUE as well.
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Question by:Shaye Larsen
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Expert Comment

by:Katie Pierce
ID: 40541505
Highlight entire list

Click Conditional Formatting in the Home ribbon

Click Highlight Cell Rules

Click Duplicate Values

In the righthand dropdown list select Custom Format

Select your font and/or fill colors there.

Click OK, then OK.
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Author Comment

by:Shaye Larsen
ID: 40542497
That is not what I am after.  There are some duplicates that I don't want highlighted.  I just need to highlight any duplicates of emails that already are highlighted.
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Expert Comment

by:Katie Pierce
ID: 40542579
Ah, I see. Sorry for misunderstanding. As far as I'm aware, you can't have a logic statement factor in the existing formatting of a cell, but I am curious to see if someone else has a trick.
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Author Comment

by:Shaye Larsen
ID: 40551934
Ok, thanks for trying.
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Expert Comment

by:Katie Pierce
ID: 40552000
Hey, this would take a couple more steps than a simple formula, and I don't know how many rows you have, but you could always:

-create a column that you manually enter something like "x" if the email is blue
-sort rows by that column, so all the blue emails are now grouped together
-select the whole list and do a conditional formatting where UNIQUE values are made a color that is not blue
-manually make blue what's left (you may also need to re-make-blue any of the "x" marked emails that were unique and thus changed to the new color)

Again, this might be insane if you have thousands of rows, but it would be a reasonable workaround for a small chunk.
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Author Comment

by:Shaye Larsen
ID: 40552280
My lists are massive.  Several thousand records.  Anything manual is out.
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Expert Comment

by:Katie Pierce
ID: 40552292
May I ask the end desired result? Is there a particular reason the blue duplicates need highlighting?
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Author Comment

by:Shaye Larsen
ID: 40552535
What I am after is a way to find out all emails (or people) that have taken a certain training course.  It is easy to highlight the ones who have taken the course I am after.  However, if they have taken that course, then I need to find their names on any other courses and also highlight those.  What I am after is to remove those people from my list.  So, in short. Anyone who has taken a certain course remove them from the list and any other records with their email.

This is why I was thinking of highlighting the flagged course by highlighting those whole rows with blue text.  The hard part is then to find any emails that match a blue email and make them blue as well.
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Expert Comment

by:Katie Pierce
ID: 40552544
Ah, I see. So then is the course listed in another column?  If so, you could rely on the values to get some logic statements working on your side.  As it is, logic statements can't look at formatting to help you.

If you want to upload a small sample, I could take a look for you.
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Author Comment

by:Shaye Larsen
ID: 40553767
k, sample attached.  Note the F column.  I first need to find everyone that has the "Online" course.  Then, anyone that has the online course, I need to find what other courses they have.  So for example, all the "Jane Does" will be called out because she has an online course.  But all the John Does will not cause he does not have an online course.
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Expert Comment

by:Katie Pierce
ID: 40553774
Nothing was attached.
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Author Comment

by:Shaye Larsen
ID: 40553796
Hmm, try that
test2.xlsx
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Accepted Solution

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Katie Pierce earned 500 total points
ID: 40553847
OK, here's what I tried:

-I sorted all the rows by Column F
-I cut the entire "Online" section and pasted in another sheet (you could also just move them to the bottom or top of your entire list--you just want any non-online items to be all grouped together.
-I put this formula in Column G: =VLOOKUP(C2,Sheet2!C1:F15,4,FALSE)
-This returned "Online" for any email addresses that showed up in the Online list, and "#N/A" for everyone else. Drag formula down the whole list.
-I didn't do this step yet, but you could then sort this list by Column G & delete all the "Online" rows.

Give this a try on your big list and let me know if anything goes wrong & we'll revisit it!
test3.xlsx
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Assisted Solution

by:Katie Pierce
Katie Pierce earned 500 total points
ID: 40553854
Oh, you know I just caught myself in one error:

The formula should be: =VLOOKUP(C2,Sheet2!$C$1:$F$15,4,FALSE)

so that as you drag it down it keeps looking at the same array, and doesn't shift that down a row each time.
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Author Comment

by:Shaye Larsen
ID: 40554013
I think we are close.  Your first formula worked, but yes, it incremented the number so it didn't to the whole sheet.  The second formula is not producing the "online" values.
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Author Comment

by:Shaye Larsen
ID: 40554016
Nevermind, I think I got it.  Checking it out, one minute.
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Author Comment

by:Shaye Larsen
ID: 40554054
Awesome.  You did it.  Thanks
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