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Basic Javascript, how to tell if a variable is undefined

I thought I'd gotten this down pat, but I'm encountering a bizarre thing here. In my code sample is a function with no arguments. Within it, I test if the variable 'options' is undefined. But instead of the IF statement giving me the alert box, JavaScript itself is bombing out ("Uncaught ReferenceError: options is not defined") when it encounters the 'options' variable, and hence, does not even execute the alert function. Can anyone tell me what's wrong with this?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Test</title>
        <meta charset="UTF-8">
        <script type="text/javascript">
            function test() { // no arguments
                if (options === undefined) // This is not working, why?
                    alert("options is not defined");
                else
                    alert("options is defined");
            }
        </script>

    </head>
    <body>

        <input type="button" id="btnShowBox" value="Show Box" onclick="test();" />
    </body>
</html>

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0
elepil
Asked:
elepil
3 Solutions
 
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
Because 'undefined' is not a value that you can make a comparison against.  Actually, it's just not a value.
Something like this works because it has a value to make a comparison against.  From http://www.w3schools.com/js/tryit.asp?filename=tryjs_comparison3
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>

<p>Assign 5 to x, and display the value of the comparison (x === "5").</p>

<button onclick="myFunction()">Try it</button>

<p id="demo"></p>

<script>
function myFunction() {
    var x = 5;
    if(x === "5") document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = (x === "5");
   else  document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = (x === "5");
}
</script>

</body>
</html>

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0
 
arnoldCommented:
You should check for undefined using == undefined which is the same as checking if it is null.
A detailed explanation on the difference are outlined at
http://www.bloggingdeveloper.com/post/JavaScript-null-vs-undefined-The-Difference-between-null-and-undefined.aspx
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elepilAuthor Commented:
Dave, thanks for responding.

I was testing the existence/nonexistence of a variable called 'option'. Your example assigns a value to 'x' and then tests it. It's not quite what I was asking.

Let me put a more realistic scenario. Let's say your project involves loading plugins and scripts written by others. You wanted to test if a variable 'a' has already been used or not before using it yourself. How would you test that the variable 'a' in code?
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Jeffrey Dake Senior Director of TechnologyCommented:
You need to use the typeof check.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Test</title>
        <meta charset="UTF-8">
        <script type="text/javascript">
            function test() { // no arguments
                if (typeof options != "undefined") 
                    alert("options is defined");
                else
                    alert("options is not defined");
            }
        </script>

    </head>
    <body>

        <input type="button" id="btnShowBox" value="Show Box" onclick="test();" />
    </body>
</html>

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Here is an article that explains the topic pretty well.  Look for the section titled How do I code against variables that may not exist? it explains it pretty well.

https://javascriptweblog.wordpress.com/2010/08/16/understanding-undefined-and-preventing-referenceerrors/

Hope this helps!
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elepilAuthor Commented:
Arnold, if you tested out the short code I provided, you will see that == or === makes no difference. JavaScript just bombs out at the first encounter with the 'options' variable, as I stated in my post, giving the error message "Uncaught ReferenceError: options is not defined".
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arnoldCommented:
Presumably each author is using only local/private variables with functions with defined API.
In that type of arrangement, ..
Alternatively using uniquely naming convention.
How many variables are you contemplating on testing and what the remedy if a variable you test

Not sure I understand the premise.
Presumably you have a site and there are several sources of scripts dealing with different aspects of site functionality that are included.
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elepilAuthor Commented:
Thanks to all who responded!
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