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General question of transfer of IP address range - changing ISP

Posted on 2015-01-10
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Last Modified: 2015-01-18
Question is - Should this be a difficult thing to achieve. Id rather not have to redo all of my Public address space/DMZ. The question really is (I'm been told it cant be done by a colleague here - However I have a suspicion he is just being slack about it). - Is it fairly commonly "not possible" ? - or as a rule common and reasonably "easy"

have 2 public sub-nets one 14 IPs other 6 IPs  so  /28 other /29
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Question by:philb19
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9 Comments
 
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Neil Russell earned 672 total points
ID: 40541725
It is not possible no.  An ISP will "BUY" a block of IP addresses that are assigned to them  they can not be transferred, they are not allocated to you.
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by:Dave Baldwin
Dave Baldwin earned 664 total points
ID: 40541733
Neilsr is right, the IP addresses belong to your ISP.  Since they are so scarce, I can't imagine them letting them go so you use them with another ISP.
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Author Comment

by:philb19
ID: 40541735
As they are scarce then - Yes i was aware of this - Will new ISP have trouble accommodating my requirements?
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Assisted Solution

by:Dimitris Ioakimoglou
Dimitris Ioakimoglou earned 664 total points
ID: 40541736
In order to be able to switch ISPs and keep your IPs, you need to have them allocated to your organization by one of the RIRs.
If you're in Europe then the RIR responsible would be RIPE, in the US it's ARIN etc.

(More info on what an RIR does, here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regional_Internet_registry )

Right now, judging mostly by the size of your public IP blocks, those IPs are assigned to you by your ISP. That means that a RIR has allocated large blocks to your ISP, who, in turn, assigned a portion of them to you. Unfortunately, you can't use them through another ISP.

If you get your own allocation (which is going to be somewhat tough due to IPv4 exhaustion but maybe RIRs are still giving some small blocks away), then you will be able to keep using them through whichever ISP you choose, even multiple ones.
The technical side of this has to do with BGP and how routes to your ip blocks are advertised, but I think we'll drift out of your question's scope.

Keep in mind, if a RIR allocates an IP block to you, it will be a new one and NOT the one your ISP is providing you with right now. So if you take this step, it will only help you with future changes and not your current situation.

So the answer to your question is : If your IPs are provided to you by your ISP, then changing your ISP means losing them.
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LVL 37

Expert Comment

by:Neil Russell
ID: 40541739
"Will new ISP have trouble accommodating my requirements?"

That depends on your requirements.  Please state
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LVL 1

Author Comment

by:philb19
ID: 40541742
perfect answer -thanks all who answered
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by:philb19
ID: 40541898
Dont mind spliting at all
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