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Upgrading App From Access 2003 to 2010

Posted on 2015-01-11
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Last Modified: 2015-01-18
I am planning to move a client app from Access 2003 to Access 2010.  I am aware of some 2003 functionality that has changed/is different/isn't supported in 2010.

The first is the menu system.  The application menu's developed in 2003 are for the most part supported in 2010 but no changes can be made to pop-up menu's.  For this reason I thinks it would be best to recreate the menu's in 2010.  Based on some prior EE advice I have purchased Ribbon Creator IDBE 2010 for that purpose.

The existing app has a shortcut menu available on all reports.  One of the options is 'Export..."  Once selected it allows the user to choose the type of export (Word, Excel, RTF etc..) they want.  However, when the MDB is run under 2010, selecting this option gets an unsupported function message.  I understand that in 2010 the exports are more specific and I will need to create a new shortcut menu with 'Export to Word', 'Export to Excel' etc...  I have started working on these menus and have some created.

I also learned that these new menu's are not 'resident' in 2010 and have to be loaded at start up to make them available to the user.

I'm asking those of you that have gone thru the 2003 to 2010 process prior to me to identify other functionality or commands that work differently, or not at all in 2010.  Perhaps even areas where the answer is 'The 2003 command/function works in 2010 but can be improved using new features of functionality available in 2010.

I realize there is no one correct answer to this post and will will award the point among helpful responses.
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Question by:mlcktmguy
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Assisted Solution

by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP)
DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP) earned 150 total points
ID: 40543664
"Based on some prior EE advice I have purchased Ribbon Creator IDBE 2010 for that purpose."
I strongly suggest that you do ... recreate your custom menu bars using RC2010.  Whereas you can ... still make just your legacy menu bars show w/o the Ribbon in A2010, that is not the case should you upgrade to A2013. And .. the Ribbon is not going away, but the menu bars could in A20xx. RC2010 is a fabulous tool.

"I also learned that these new menu's are not 'resident' in 2010 and have to be loaded at start up to make them available to the user."
I assume you mean the Ribbon ?  If so, well ... once you have a USysRibbons table ... and in the Access Options specify your Ribbon Name ... it will load automatically.   RC2010 pretty much takes care of this for you.

mx
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by:Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 75 total points
ID: 40544334
As Joe said - use the Ribbon Creator, and most of the work is done for you, especially if you use the built-in commands. The Export functions are just that, so essentially you just use RC to include them in your custom ribbons.
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:-)
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Nick67 earned 175 total points
ID: 40545054
I run and develop in A2003 and have apps deployed in A2003, 2010 and 2013 that interoperate without a great deal of trouble.  You should already be split into a front-end / back-end configuration and have methods of deploy the frontends to each and every machine that uses the app.  I've rolled my own .vbs scripts for the purpose, but if you have the budget, Tony Toews's AutoFE Updater is well-regarded
http://autofeupdater.com/

The biggest PITA for me is that MSCal.ocx was deprecated.  The DatePicker is nice and all, but it has no events.  I have created .reg files that will get MSCal.ocx working in A2010 and A2013 to work around that.  MS may have deprecated and stop distributing it, but it still works :)

I don't know if you are already on Win 7, but Win 7 & Access & SendKeys are a bad combination.  Find and replace any SendKeys code you may have if you are migrating from XP.  SendKeys causes NumLock to toggle on and off in Win 7.

The Trust Center is an annoyance.  I have created .reg files that create the desired Trust Center settings so I can avoid having to do that repeatedly on each machine.

The Nav Pain is a pain.  It will NEVER be hidden when a user first opens an newly deployed front-end and cannot be programmatically made completely hidden if it was open.  Any time you do a TableDef refresh (like if you replace linked csv files in code and refresh the linked table) will cause the Nav Pain to open.  This behavior is innate and cannot be suppressed in an mdb/accdb file.

A lot of things that cannot be controlled about the Ribbon/BackStage and be suppressed by the use of accdr/mdr file names, but you then must have an app that is completely compliant with the constraints of the run-time environment.

You now have built-in support for exporting reports (and other objects, but really reports) in PDF format directly.  Code that switched printers to PDF printers for output and back to the default printer is now no longer necessary.

The Snapshot format has been deprecated.  Very few people used it because its immense file sizes made it impractical, but if you were using it, you are out of luck.

The Access 2010 help is greatly inferior to the 2003 help, and the online help for O2010 was deprecated in May of this year.  You must configure for local help only -- and it stinks.

Any objects created by A2007+ wizards become rapidly corrupt if altered by A2003.  You may think that you'll save time and be productive by creating nice Access objects in A2010 and then completing their configuration and design in A2003.
You will not.  You'll have a bunch of corrupted objects, instead.

A2007+ removed the ability to right-click a control and bring up the properties window -- and from there to open the event handlers and code.  I find this to be a serious productivity killer as I have always done this.  Others swear off altering running objects, so this is not a change they find unhappy.
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by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP)
DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP) earned 150 total points
ID: 40545128
" I have created .reg files that will get MSCal.ocx working in A2010 and A2013 to work around that."
Actually, you can just put it in the same folder as your app and set a VBA Reference to it.

"The Nav Pain is a pain.  "
One of the best things that ever happened to the Access UI ... infinitely more flexible that the old pane. And ... Groups are now finally useful.

mx
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by:Nick67
ID: 40545163
LOL @mx
Actually, you can just put it in the same folder as your app...
I tried that.
Without the registry settings it doesn't work for me. YMMV

One of the best things that ever happened to the Access UI ... infinitely more flexible that the old pane. And ... Groups are now finally useful.
With 159 tables, 496 queries, 170 forms, 158 reports, and 50 modules, a flat file listing is pretty much useless.  If I ever leave A2003 for good, I'll get around to coding the replacement form for the Database Window -- because the Nav Pain and the Metro UI share a common failing -- that people will search by typing the first few characters.  I depend upon seeing items in context.  A context that has been willfully removed.
It works for you.  It doesn't work for me.
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by:Helen_Feddema
Helen_Feddema earned 100 total points
ID: 40547812
See my White Paper on this topic; it lists a number of changes that may need to be made when updating.  You might also want to consider my New Style Main Menu.

White-Paper----Upgrading-to-Access-2007-

http://www.helenfeddema.com/Files/accarch212.zip

New Style Main Menu
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Author Comment

by:mlcktmguy
ID: 40550027
Thanks to all for the comments.

Yes the legacy 2003 mdb's are split into data, which resides on the server and procedures (MDE), which resides on the user machines mdb's.

I use Sagekey 2003 for distribution of the existing 2003 application and have purchased Sagekey 2010 for use on the 2010 apps.

Nick67 mentioned the trust center requirement.  I was concentrating on the application and hadn't thought about the trust center issue on deployments.  Could you please provide more information about how this is set up on user machines?
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by:Nick67
ID: 40550039
It can be hacked into the registry in whatever fashion suits:

 This to permit a network location
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\14.0\Access\Security\Trusted Locations]
 "AllowNetworkLocations"=dword:00000001


 This for each permitted path, starting at location zero
Local path

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\14.0\Access\Security\Trusted Locations\Location0]
 "Path"="DriveLetter:\\foldername\\"
 "AllowSubfolders"=dword:00000001
 "Description"=""
 "Date"="28/03/2013 9:41 AM"


Network path
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\14.0\Access\Security\Trusted Locations\Location1]
 "Path"="\\\\server\\share\\"
 "AllowSubfolders"=dword:00000001
 "Description"=""
 "Date"="28/03/2013 9:41 AM"


 I got tired of putting them in.
 Now a double click of a .reg file does it.
 Access 2013 is version 15.0, that's the only change
 Access 2007, God help you, is version 12.0

You may be able to push it out via GPO or login scripts.
VBA is a chicken-and-egg problem.  How do you use VBA to update the registry when the registry needs to be updated to run the VBA.
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Author Closing Comment

by:mlcktmguy
ID: 40556899
Thank You
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