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How to write formatted get-process output to a file

Posted on 2015-01-12
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Last Modified: 2015-01-12
I need a Powershell script to save the output of get-process to a text file.  It should have the following columns:  ProcessName, WS and CPU.  I tried this command:

get-process | sort-object WS -descending | select ProcessName, WS, CPU | add-content c:\temp\procmem.txt

It produced the following output:

@{ProcessName=iexplore; WS=378351616; CPU=134.6756633}
@{ProcessName=iexplore; WS=216297472; CPU=47.2527029}
@{ProcessName=OUTLOOK; WS=142602240; CPU=139.2620927}
...

I need it to look like this:

ProcessName           WS                        CPU
iexplore                      378351616         134.6756633
iexplore                      216297472         47.2527029
OUTLOOK                  142602240         139.2620927
...
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Question by:McThump
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oBdA earned 2000 total points
ID: 40543869
Try
get-process | sort-object WS -descending | select ProcessName, WS, CPU | Format-Table -AutoSize | Out-String | add-content c:\temp\procmem.txt

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Author Closing Comment

by:McThump
ID: 40544638
That works. Thanks!
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