?
Solved

SQL server 2008 R2 sizing

Posted on 2015-01-12
2
Medium Priority
?
102 Views
Last Modified: 2015-01-26
I have an application that end-users have reported to behave very slowly.
The application is on a seperate Win2008 R2 server, and uses a DB on a 2-node SQL 2008 R2 Standard cluster (on Win2008 R2 Enterprise).

I suspect that the SQL cluster is not running optimally. I have not started to log performance yet, as it is a little complicated (many people involved).

The SQL cluster is running 29 databases in one instance, some databases are around 130 GB in size, and the total size of DB's is 600 GB. The cluster is running SQL 2008 R2 Standard, with 64 GB RAM. I know that Standard edition of SQL only support 64 GB RAM, could this be an issue for this workload?

I am planning to migrate the disks (SAN, with RAID 0+1 on midrange 10 000 RPM SAS disks) to either better 15 000 RPM FC disks, or SSD disks.

But I need some  first impression from you guys.
My initial thought are that 64 GB RAM is way to low for the workload. I don't know of other applications with DB's on the same cluster have performance issues, but I suspect so. The instance is capped to use 60 GB of RAM, leaving 4 GB available.

So what do you think? Might be a problem?
0
Comment
Question by:xcomiii
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 51

Expert Comment

by:Vitor Montalvão
ID: 40544477
The easiest thing is to think that's an hardware issue but more than 90% of the times it isn't.
I recommend you to launch a SQL Profiler to check for blocking processes and long running queries. Capture those queries and analyze them one by one. You might need to create indexes to improve the performance of those queries.
0
 
LVL 69

Accepted Solution

by:
Scott Pletcher earned 2000 total points
ID: 40544775
You can run the code to see if any "low memory" conditions are detected.  If not, you probably don't have any significant mem pressure at the moment to worry about.

Have you looked at the Top Avg and Total I/O queries?  Sometimes they'll be a "bad" query or two that will really slam a server's performance.  Nowadays issues tend to be RAM or I/O rather than CPU (although that's not 100% guaranteed, of course, esp. if you do lots of xml in SQL).
0

Featured Post

Visualize your virtual and backup environments

Create well-organized and polished visualizations of your virtual and backup environments when planning VMware vSphere, Microsoft Hyper-V or Veeam deployments. It helps you to gain better visibility and valuable business insights.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

In this article I will describe the Detach & Attach method as one possible migration process and I will add the extra tasks needed for an upgrade when and where is applied so it will cover all.
In this article I will describe the Backup & Restore method as one possible migration process and I will add the extra tasks needed for an upgrade when and where is applied so it will cover all.
Have you created a query with information for a calendar? ... and then, abra-cadabra, the calendar is done?! I am going to show you how to make that happen. Visualize your data!  ... really see it To use the code to create a calendar from a q…
How to fix incompatible JVM issue while installing Eclipse While installing Eclipse in windows, got one error like above and unable to proceed with the installation. This video describes how to successfully install Eclipse. How to solve incompa…

770 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question