Can an Interbase server be linked as a linked server to an MS SQL 2008 server

Hello,
I'm an access developer with some MS SQL developer experience.  I've run into a situation where the client's query on his access database are running very slow. This query is based on 3 linked MS Sql queries (located in the MS SQL server) and one linked query located on an Interbase database.  Needless to say, since the query is being executed on the MS Access front-end, it is very slow.  Is there a way to set up the Interbase server as a linked server on the MS Sql server.  If so, what considerations do I need to take into account.
Juan VelasquezAsked:
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SimonConnect With a Mentor Commented:
>This query is based on 3 linked MS Sql queries (located in the MS SQL server) and one linked query located on an Interbase database.

Depending on the volatility of the data on the interbase server, you may be able to do scheduled replication of it (using SSIS) to the MSSQL server, so that more of the work can be done in a single backend rather than the a heterogenous query involving MSSQL and Interbase database or at the client PC.
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Kelvin SparksCommented:
If can install and call the ODBC driver for Interbase on the SQL Server itself, you should be OK. Once installed, it will show in the Providers dropdown if available. Possibly one of the existing providers will work - is a matter of trying them.


Kelvin
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SimonCommented:
Almost certainly it can be added as a linked server if you have an ODBC driver for it.

Is your SQL Server 32bit or 64bit? and do you have a matching ODBC driver for interbase?

The linked queries could be executed in a number of ways from MSSQL including OPENROWSET('linkedServerName','select * from a inner join b on a.id=b.id')
or four part notation
select * from linkedservername.database.schema.a A inner join linkedservername.database.schema.b B on A.id=B.id

Security wise, you can save login credentials in the linked server definition or provide them in OPENROWSET queries.

On our initial install of MSSQL2008R2, using a particular 32bit version of an ODBC driver for a MUMPS database, I managed to bring the whole server down at one point. An updated 64bit version of the ODBC driver for the linked server cured that problem, but I've been a little wary of linked servers ever since. Definitely test initially on a non-production setup.
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Juan VelasquezAuthor Commented:
Hello Simon,

I believe the client is running the 64 bit version of MS SQL Server 2008.  That does raise a red flag for me.  A few years ago, I was developing a VB.Net / MS Sql Server 2008 application.  For some reason (this was 6 years ago), I needed to load an Excel driver on to the server.  Imagine my surprise that Microsoft had not released a 64 bit Excel driver.  I ended up reworking some of the code.
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Juan VelasquezAuthor Commented:
Actually Simon, using replication is not a bad idea.  I'll bring that up with the SQL server team.
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SimonCommented:
OK. They may groan if there's a lot of tables, so it would be good if you can define the required dataset tightly - the less data the more frequently you'll be able to get snapshots and the fresher the data will be.

I run lots of bulk data imports overnight and at weekends, and can then pull just a few rows of volatile data to complete most of my requirements - your requirement for up-to-the-minute data may be different though.
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Juan VelasquezAuthor Commented:
I think the client would be happy with a daily update.
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Juan VelasquezAuthor Commented:
I think that SSIS is the best solution and have proposed it.
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