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SharePoint - should I make it a seperate instance on an existing SQL Server?

Posted on 2015-01-19
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Last Modified: 2015-01-20
We will deploy the latest SharePoint Foundation (60+ users) but we do not know if we should make a separate instance for SharePoint on our existing SQL Server 2008 R2 to save SQL licensing or buy a new SQL Server dedicated to SharePoint which can cost quite much.
At this moment, our existing SQL Server 2008 R2 is only used for our business critical ERP software (20+ users). The ERP databases have confidential financial data. If we make a separate instance for SharePoint, we are concerned that the SharePoint admin/programmer will get into them, as he would like to have local admin privilege to the server running SQL Server 2008 R2.
Also, we are concerned that his work (development, testing, administration) on SharePoint may affect our ERP software which is very critical for the business.

I am wondering if anyone has experienced the same dilemma as us? Or maybe we should simply spend some money to get a new dedicated SQL Server for SharePoint?
Any thoughts?

Thanks!!
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Question by:techcity
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Rainer Jeschor earned 500 total points
ID: 40558661
Hi,
if your ERP system / SQL server is mission critical AND you have concerns in regards to confidentiality, then there is no other way than running the SQL server for SharePoint on a dedicated system.
The admin of SharePoint has to have local admin rights and if your SQL server for your ERP is configured to have local admins as sysadmin members, then the SharePoint admin will get access to the server.
It depends a lot what you want to do with your SharePoint installation. You might want to use the SQL Express edition (free) if you can live with the limitations it has (1 CPU, 10GB database size, harder scale out afterwards). Please do not run a standalone installation but a server farm installation where you install all on the same box (if you want to save Windows Server licenses).
The biggest issue I see is that you speak of one SharePoint installation, but you will have to have at least two of them. One for dev, testing, patch testing, ... and one for production.
Just my 2ct
Rainer
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by:techcity
ID: 40558701
Thanks Rainer for the prompt comments!
And I have two questions about your comments if you do not mind
1. The major function for our SharePoint is workflows, we have over 30 of them. If we do server farm installation (all on the same box), how much will this compromise the performance considering we have 60+ users?
2. Per your suggestion,  we should do 2 installations, one for dev/testing/patch, and one for production. but this will double the licensing on SQL and Windows server. Do you have any ideas how we can save some on this?
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by:Rainer Jeschor
Rainer Jeschor earned 500 total points
ID: 40558775
Hi,
Q1:
That depends on what the workflows are doing/executing and what resources your box has. Are you running SharePoint designer workflows or coded ones (new workflow engine)?
A four core with 32GB RAM should normally do the trick in your case, but SharePoint is a little beast in regards to resources.
Free bonus:
Please have an eye on the SQL server installation, as normally this one is run as ootb - and this can cost a lot of performance (separating tempdb, data files, log files ...).
Q2:
Imho you might be able to run your test/dev installation on SQL Express which adds just a Windows Server license to your bill. Can you afford an interuption of your workflows for a couple of days? Can you afford a workflow running amok due to a patch? If yes, you might be OK with one system - but I would never ever in my life recommend such a setup or as a consultant run a project without written statement from the customer that he really understand and accept the huge risks.
Free bonus:
SharePoint is a real platform. It offers a great toolset, but as with all tools - you have to know exactly when to use what tool in which way (e.g. you can use a screwdriver to drive in a nail - but a hammer might have been the better tool :-))

HTH
Rainer
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by:techcity
ID: 40560891
Great information, you are a real expert!
Thanks again!!
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