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Using IN with an MS Access query

I am using MS access as a database for a small website. I'm working on building a search page. Can you use IN as part of a query in Access on a filed that ins a number? If so, is there an example? My current statement looks like this:
SELECT * FROM Stats WHERE 1=1 And PosID IN (2,5) And Hits > 50

That does not return anything. The PosID field is a number. It will work on other fields that are text.
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dodgerfan
Asked:
dodgerfan
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1 Solution
 
Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
what about this as a test

SELECT * FROM Stats WHERE PosID IN (2,5)
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PatHartmanCommented:
Yes, you can use IN() in a query, however, you can't make it variable.  In most queries, the criteria can be supplied at runtime - Select .. From .. Where somefield = Forms!yourform!somefield
But,
Select .. From .. Where somefield  In(Forms!yourform!somefield)  -- Will NOT WORK

To use the In() clause, you will need to build the SQL as a string using VBA and use the resulting string to replace a RowSource or RecordSoucre.  Or in the case of an action query, run the string using the .execute method.
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Dale FyeCommented:
Assuming that PosId and Hits are numeric, that syntax is correct, although i wonder what the purpose  is of the

1=1

Portion of the criteria is.
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LowfatspreadCommented:
@dale 1=1 is a stand sql where clause technique used to allow a  where clause to be simply extended without considering if this is the first "variable" condition being implemented.... e.g.  clauses can be generated as AND x = ..... without logic being required to add the actual WHERE

hth
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Dale FyeCommented:
@Lowfatspread,

I guess I've been doing it the hard way all of these years, creating a varWHERE variant variable that is separate from the main strSQL and then appending the two.   Then, when I add parameters to the criteria I test

if Len(me.txt_SomeParameter) > 0 Then
    varWHERE = (varWHERE + " AND ") & " [SomeField] = " & me.txt_SomeParameter
End If

Then, after adding all parameters, I would use:

strSQL = strSQL & (" WHERE " + varWHERE)
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dodgerfanAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the help. I tried a different version of Access. Using 2007 is giving me the problem. Using 2010 returns records with this statement: SELECT * FROM Stats WHERE PosID IN (2,5)
Is there some difference in versions I should know?
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PatHartmanCommented:
If PosID is numeric, the results should be the same.  If it is not numeric, then you might run into differences as each version may process an invalid statement differently.
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Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)Commented:
using
SELECT * FROM Stats WHERE PosID IN (2,5)

returns records

then PosID is Definitely Number Data Type

there must be something wrong with your A2007 version.
try to uninstall the office 2007, reboot your pc then install office 2007.

note: do not install two version of access in one PC


.
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Mike EghtebasDatabase and Application DeveloperCommented:
also try:

SELECT * FROM Stats WHERE PosID IN (2,5) or IsNull(PosID)

The following is also a good way to check your data quality:

SELECT Vartype(PosID) As Data_Type, IsNull(PosID,"IsNull) As NullExists FROM Stats

to make sure all are 2 number not 8.
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