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Migrate from SBS2003 to WinSrv2k8

Posted on 2015-01-20
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Last Modified: 2015-01-28
Hi,

I am looking to transition from a SBS2003 server to a WinSrv2k8R2 machine. I do not require Exchange on the new machine.

I have found and read the following excellent articles:
a) http://www.experts-exchange.com/Software/Server_Software/Email_Servers/Exchange/A_2881-Migrate-Small-Business-Server-2003-to-Exchange-2010-and-Windows-2008-R2.html
b) http://blogs.technet.com/b/infratalks/archive/2012/09/07/transition-from-small-business-server-to-standard-windows-server.aspx

Before starting the process I would like to clarify the following:
a) As I am not migrating exchange do I first need to remove it from the SBS machine or simply ignore it?

b) There seems to be some discrepancy between the two articles above.
=> Step 3 of the EE article raises the functional levels of the SBS Server (domain & forest) whereas the TechNet article does not include this step.
=> Step 3 of the EE article runs the following four steps whereas the TechNet article only includes the first two
1) adprep32 /forestprep
2) adprep32 /domainprep
3) adprep32 /domainprep /gpprep
4) adprep32 /rodcprep
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Question by:Ethan Darwin
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by:Simon Butler (Sembee)
Simon Butler (Sembee) earned 167 total points
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First - what are you doing with Exchange? Are you removing it, moving it to another machine, something else?
If you are discarding Exchange because you have gone to the cloud, then I would remove it completely from the SBS Server. That way if you decide to reintroduce Exchange for any reason, you don't have the remains left in the domain which will require manual removal. Removing it with the server active is much easier and well documented.

The SBS server should be on Windows 2003 native. If it is on mixed, then you will have to raise the domain and forest to native to install the Windows 2008 or higher DC.

As for the prep commands, it doesn't really matter. They take all of 30 seconds to run, if you don't need then it doesn't do anything.

Simon.
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by:arnold
arnold earned 333 total points
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The first thing, is you do nothing to the SBS. no changes.

You use the adprep32 for each  /forestprep, /domainprep, /gpprep, /rodcprep
On the windows 2008, make sure you add roles AD -Domain service, DNS, DHCP features you add RSAT, filesharing, including windows 2003 related portion that deals/handles the NTFRS based replication which.
join the system as another Domain Controller.
Let it replicate. make sure the sysvol is replicated and displayed on this system. net share.

At this stage, you need to configure DHCP, you can have both running as long as they issue different IPs, one way to do this, is use exclusion rule to reduce the existing SBS DHCP
usually with two the ... 70%/30% i.e. exclude if you are allocating 2-254, you can exclude 200-254

Then on the windows 2008 you would allocate 200-254 by excluding the 2-199.
Make sure if you have static Ip reservation that you include them here.
Scope options, name servers should reflect the IP of this windows 2008 server.

When you are are ready, you would transfer the roles at which point the SBS will start shutting down as it is no longer the master and it can be removed from the network.
After you make sure all is working, you can cleanup the AD removing the SBS .......
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by:Ethan Darwin
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As a follow up question...

In step 2 of the EE article it directs me to setup the R2 server using DHCP and in step 5 is directs me to transfer DHCP from SBS2k3 to the R2 box.

Surely the R2 box should be setup with a static IP first?
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arnold earned 333 total points
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When setting up servers, Static IP allocation is implicit.

As I noted you need not transfer the DHCP roles as long as each DHCP configured on the network is allocating a unique range of IPs (reserved IPs must be the same on all servers)
Scope 192.168.0.0/24
DHCP 1 192.168.0.2-192.168.0.63
DHCP 2 192.168.0.64-192.168.0127
DHCP 3 192.168.0.128-192.168.0.191




The segments used by 2 and 3 will be excluded on DHCP 1
the 192.168.0.192-192.168.0.254 could be for the statically assigned. or they can be broken in half with a portion statically assigned, and the other half DHCP IP reservation (Maintain a static IP but DHCP server controlled)  Printers would often fall into this group.
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