Improve company productivity with a Business Account.Sign Up

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 342
  • Last Modified:

swapfile on RAID, or not?

I've just set up my Linux boot device as a RAID-1. Seems to work OK. I've not been sure about what to do with swap space. Googling turned up this interesting statement http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Software-RAID-HOWTO-2.html

There's no reason to use RAID for swap performance reasons. The kernel itself can stripe swapping on several devices, if you just give them the same priority in the /etc/fstab file.

A nice /etc/fstab looks like:
/dev/sda2       swap           swap    defaults,pri=1   0 0
/dev/sdb2       swap           swap    defaults,pri=1   0 0
:
/dev/sdg2       swap           swap    defaults,pri=1   0 0

This setup lets the machine swap in parallel on seven SCSI devices. No need for RAID, since this has been a kernel feature for a long time.
Sounds like I don't need my swap partitions inside a RAID. But then in the very next paragraph he says,
Another reason to use RAID for swap is high availability. If you set up a system to boot on eg. a RAID-1 device, the system should be able to survive a disk crash. But if the system has been swapping on the now faulty device, you will for sure be going down. Swapping on a RAID-1 device would solve this problem.
Is this contradicting he immediate preceding statement or am I just not reading something right? Which way is he recommending? Are non-RAID swap partitions a good thing or a bad thing?

Confused!
0
jmarkfoley
Asked:
jmarkfoley
  • 2
  • 2
1 Solution
 
Frosty555Commented:
It's giving you information about the pros and cons of putting the swap partition on a RAID array.

The linux kernel supports striping swap data cross multiple swap partitions without the need for a RAID-0 array to do that for you. So if you intend on putting the swap partition on a big RAID-0 array in an attempt to boost performance, is not necessary.

But that's completely besides the point if your purpose for putting it on the RAID array is for high availability. After all, even if your Linux OS is on a super-resilient RAID array, the death of your swap disk will cause the whole system to go down until you fix it. Sure you might not any actual data, but your server will certainly be down until you fix it.

Basically, you should put your swap partition on the RAID array. The article is just pointing out that striping  swap data across multiple swap partitions without using a RAID array is a native and well-supported feature of Linux.
0
 
jmarkfoleyAuthor Commented:
OK, I was suspecting that was the idea, but not sure. So, if I have the non-RAID method of multiple swap partitions on the RAID drives and one of the drives fails, I'm down, right? Which is totally NOT what I want. That's the point of the RAID (at least my point). I can create minutely backups of the main drive to a 2nd drive with rsync, so simply backing up data is not really why I want a RAID setup.

Therefore, I supposed I need to RAIDify my swap partitions.
0
 
Frosty555Commented:
Yep, you got it.
0
 
jmarkfoleyAuthor Commented:
Did it. It works just fine!
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Build your data science skills into a career

Are you ready to take your data science career to the next step, or break into data science? With Springboard’s Data Science Career Track, you’ll master data science topics, have personalized career guidance, weekly calls with a data science expert, and a job guarantee.

  • 2
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now