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How to size migration from SBS2003 to Exchange 2010

Posted on 2015-01-25
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Hi,

It's time to migrate off of SBS2003 to isolate the domain controller and Exchange. I am looking for resources to size my environment.

Our Exchange 2003 mailbox store is around 62GB, for approx. 60 users, however, my goal is to absorb dozens of PSTs into the mailboxes.

Any suggestions on how to calculate this would be helpful.  I am about to place an order for new storage and servers and I need to understand the requirements.

Thanks in advance,

S.....
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Question by:svillardi
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by:Will Szymkowski
Will Szymkowski earned 1000 total points
ID: 40569848
I would start by taking a look at the Exchange Team Blog for the Role requirements calculator. This link also provides everything from RAID configuration to LUN requirements, network configurations etc. This is a highly detailed link but it should have all the answers your looking for.

Sizing for Exchange 2010 (Exchange Team Blog)

Will.
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Gareth Gudger earned 1000 total points
ID: 40569884
Definitely check out the sizing guide Will posted.

Based on my experience taking 60 users from SBS 2003 to 2010 should only require a single multi-role server (CAS, HUB & MBX). For high availability you would want to do two servers in a DAG and some form of load balancing in front.

With regard to disk space, keep in mind that Single Instance Storage goes away in 2010. So your DB will become much larger. How much larger depends on how fond of the Reply-All button your users are (especially with attachments). I would estimate a final database of around 100GB with SIS removed. Then add more capacity for growth. If you are virtualizing make sure you use fixed sized disks.

With regard to disk structure depends on if you plan to virtualize or not. I always recommend to keep Exchange on its own drive separate from the OS. If possible I always recommend splitting the Logs and Database onto their own drives. My own preference is for 4 drives. OS, Exchange install (with transport queues), logs, database.

At 62GB I would expect standard user profiles. So 8GB RAM is probably all you need.

I have a 5 part 2003 to 2010 document as well you might find useful.
https://supertekboy.com/2014/03/31/migrating-exchange-2003-2010-part/
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by:svillardi
ID: 40571849
Thank you for the quick replies.

What do you mean by fixed sized disks?  Also, I read somewhere that SIS was taken out because of the need for very fast storage.  Do you have any experience with slower storage for the priv.db?  Such as SAS, NLSAS, SATA, etc?

Also, I don't have any experience with the multiroles in Exchange.  Is there a high level guide suggested?

I will look at the links and follow up.  Thanks again!
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by:Gareth Gudger
ID: 40571864
If you are virtualizing then Exchange isn't supported on dynamically expanding disks. So if you are using VMware you shouldn't use Thin Provisioning for example with Exchange.

SIS was taken out to improve database I/O. The databases in 2010 use 90% less I/O than 2003 did. Microsoft boasts you can put Exchange on 7200 rpm SATA disks. I've put Exchange on that and its been fine.

Microsoft recommends you put all roles together versus splitting them up. So the CAS and MBX roles should be kept together on the same virtual machine/physical machine.

Ross Smith IV has a great architecture keynote on Exchange 2013 from the last Microsoft Exchange Conference.
http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/MEC/2014/ARC302
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by:svillardi
ID: 40571870
Gareth,

I am using VMware, so this is good information.  Does that mean that I cannot add space to a thick provisioned VM?

As the system grows I cannot allocate more storage?

Thanks,

S.....
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Expert Comment

by:Gareth Gudger
ID: 40571903
Yes you can allocate more storage. Just make sure it is Thick Provisioned. As long as it is not Thin Provisioned you are good.
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