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Access Conditional formatting not working

Hi Experts,

I have the attached formatting conditions set to one of the controls of my continuous forms, and for some odd reason its not showing, when I do this for the control itself that's bound to the field used in condition it works, however I need it in another control that formats the original value (minutes) into hh:mm.
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bfuchs
Asked:
bfuchs
2 Solutions
 
Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
I need it in another control that formats the original value (minutes) into hh:mm.
This works fine for me...

Can you post a sample db that exhibits this behavior?
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
however I need it in another control that formats the original value (minutes) into hh:mm.
Where is the formatting done? Since this is a Continuous form, I'd assume it's being done in the query.

Conditional formatting is finicky in many regards. From what I can tell, you're trying to set a condition if the value of "minschedthisweek" is less than 1800 or between 1800 and 2399. If so, what datatype is "minschedthisweek", and where does that data come from? If you've formatted the column from which it is derived (i.e. in the query) then you may find your conditional formats refer to the wrong field.

Do you have a field that shows the "raw" minutes, which aren't formatted? If not, you might consider adding one, and then changing your formats to refer to that field instead.
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Dale FyeCommented:
Also, if your MinSchedThisWeek value uses the NZ( ) function inside a query, you may be expecting to see a numeric value, but when used in a query, the NZ() function will return a string, so you must explicitly convert that string to a number:

MinSchedThisWeek: cLng(NZ(X, 0))
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bfuchsAuthor Commented:
Hi Experts,

I finally boiled down this issue to be version related, as its only happening on office 2k (the version I am forced to use for programming, while there're still some users with that version..)

While that at least answers your questions, why is it working by you and proves the field is named correctly and its a number type etc...however these still does not help me, as I need it to work in 2000 as well...

Thanks,
Ben
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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
Ben,

You know, its funny.
While programming in the lowest user version of Access is certainly the best way to go....
But this presumes that you are only going back a reasonable amount of versions...
;-)

Asking a 14 year old version of Access to be 100% compatible with more current versions is a stretch.
I feel your pain, ...but this may not be the only compatibility issue you have to deal with.
;-)

Check back in with Scott,... his theory sound like it should work for you.

JeffCoachman
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bfuchsAuthor Commented:
The solution was to have that formatting done in query instead of the form itself.
thanks for Scott for hinting me of that
and thanks for Jeff for pointing me back to Scott..
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bfuchsAuthor Commented:
BTW,
You know, its funny.
Its not funny at all, our manager does not want to approve upgrading to a new version unless I can prove that overall performance will increase significantly..
Unfortunately I only found it to be the opposite when compared to newer versions.
In addition to the fact that part of our app is an ADP that Microsoft abandoned in recent version..
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Helen FeddemaCommented:
The longer your manager waits to upgrade, the more painful it will be.  I recently had the dubious pleasure of updating a number of databases for a client.  Some of them were in Access 95 format.  I had to make an Access 97 VM just so I could open them and resave them as Access 97 databases, then open those databases in an Access 2003 VM, save them in that format, and finally open the 2003 dbs in Access 2010, and upgrade them to that format.  Not everything survived the multiple format transitions.
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bfuchsAuthor Commented:
@Helen_Feddema,
The reason our manager is hesitating of an upgrade is as follows.
We have an app that was orig written in 97, and eventually successful converted to 2000, since then we purchased a few licenses of 2003, and parts of our app are performing slower for those users (although each user has their own copy, and app was converted for them to 2003..).

Therefore you're right that when we are finally going to convert it will be harder, but he claims that its not worth to suffer in terms of performance until MSFT will finally come out with a product that addresses those issues...
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