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Fileserver performance

I have a Windows 2008 R2 fileserver in Hyper-V. Disk transfer times look fine with a few spikes here and there. But I'm not sure if the server has enough memory. I've google of course but I can't really find any recommendations about Memory Page Reads/sec counter. I remember that I (maybe) once saw a recommendation that it shouldn't go higher than 20. I'm hoping that someone could give me any input on this counter? I have an average of 175 over the last 10 minutes which is very high compared to the number of 20, but on the other hand task manager asys 3,5GB available memory, free is 0.

Or do I really need to dig deeper with other counters aswell to make simple analysis of whether or not the server needs more RAM?
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ReneDK
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ReneDK
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3 Solutions
 
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
what problem are you having or are you trying to be proactive ?
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rindiCommented:
File servers usually are very simple and don't need much RAM or CPU power. If there are issues. it could be with your RAID setup that has a low throughput, or a slow LAN connection.
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dan_blagutCommented:
Hello

Here you have a Microsoft counter set with explication for a file server:
https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/2008.08.pulse.aspx

or this answered question:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Windows/Q_22403758.html

Dan
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ReneDKAuthor Commented:
I'm trying to be proactive and creating baselines, but also I'm not sure if there is a bottle neck on the server. The server hosts roaming profiles and home directories, so it's hard for me to be sure whether or not the server is slowing down e.g. the login times. I'm pretty sure that disk and cpu are not causing any issues and compares to other servers I can just conclude that page reads/sec is very high, and if i recall correctly I've read something about that this counter should stay below 20
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ReneDKAuthor Commented:
Basically the question is: How much paging from the page file to memory can be going on without causing a problem... if there's a simple answer to that question. Just like there is a rule of thumb about how much latency is acceptable on disk IO before it may cause a bad user experience.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
the best way to diagnose slow login times is to use the windows performance toolkit on the client and analyse the boot/login process
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bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
general speaking you have two directions or goals to monitor the performance of the file server: one is to focus on realibility for a higher up time, and the other is for higher access speed if possible. check the coresponding performance counters from below article posted by a member of core Windows team.

FYI - Windows Performance Monitor Disk Counters Explained
http://blogs.technet.com/b/askcore/archive/2012/03/16/windows-performance-monitor-disk-counters-explained.aspx
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Gerald ConnollyCommented:
Check that your system isnt short of IOPS, On Perfmon the Blue line in the Disk activity shouldnt be at 100% and that your disk queue is low, (e.g. 2 is high)
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bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
actually, the practical suggestions have been given in the last three posts.
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