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iSeries Library Syncing

Posted on 2015-01-27
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Last Modified: 2015-01-28
Hi All,

We currently use a remote iSeries located in middle America for our production environment and we have a backup one in our headquarters.  To keep productivity going we rely on our ISP's to stay connected and we have redundancy on them.  My concern is what happens if we lose connectivity.  In the interim the hosting company created a .savf of 3 of our main libraries and then we transferred them to our ftp site and then we pulled them down; however, this process took over 24 hours.  Does anyone know a way to synchronize libraries for only deltas between two different iSeries systems not located in the same location?  

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

-Anthony
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Question by:Anthony6890
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by:Gary Patterson
ID: 40572833
Can't tell for sure form your post, but I assume you're running some sort of hardware or software replication solution between the two systems, and the concern is how to maintain synch if you lose connectivity for an extended period?  

I don't understand how you can FTP a SAVF if you don't have connectivity, so I'll leave that alone for a minute.

If you're using a software replication product (Mimix, for example), then you may be able to transmit or ship the journal receivers used by your replication tool and apply them at the remote site.  That will take care of database files and other objects that are replicated through journals.  Then you'd need to use the SAVCHGOBJ command to backup other changed objects and transmit/ship them.

SAVCHGOBJ doesn't work well for database files because even a small change causes the entire file to be saved.  

Most replication tools have features that allow them to resync quickly after an outage.  Your best bet there is to contact your replication vendor.

This is a fairly big topic, and hard to make specific recommendations without understanding a lot more about your systems, tools, replication requirements, bandwidth, backup times, restore times, data volumes, tolerance for downtime, and more.

Based on the information you've supplied, I'd say the answer is "by occastionally saving and sending (electronically or by putting tapes on a plane) critical journal receivers.  Non-database objects can be backed up periodically and shipped via SAVCHGOBJ.  Alternately, depending on the HA/replication solution you are using, there may be a way to use that tool to extract changes to a savf or tape for transmission or shipping.
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by:Anthony6890
ID: 40573183
Gary, thanks for the response.  

Let me explain further.  At the hosting location, they are currently taking care of all backups of our system state.  We do not have any replication software in place to replicate the hosted iSeries back to the HQ.  

In both locations we are running a Power 7 system with OS 6.1 in both locals.  At the hosted location, there is only an iSeries and we do not own it.  There aren't any other servers sitting in the hosted location.  For bandwidth we have up to 500Mbp upload and download in both location.  In total the 3 main libraries we would want replicated are in total under 60 Gb's.  

I just looked up the suggestion you made of Mimix and it looks like it would suit our needs.  Any other things you can suggest?

-Anthony
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Gary Patterson earned 500 total points
ID: 40573345
Mimix (and many other replication solutions) are designed primarily to allow you to replicate between systems in near-real-time.  Critical factors include the change volume, the available bandwidth, and the acceptable delay (how far behind can you afford to be at any moment.

Replication is a fairly big topic.  Prices on the various replication solutions vary significantly, and hardware solutions are also available.  

My suggestion is to engage an IBM i consultant who is well-versed in replication solutions.  Your hosting provider may also be able to assist.  Most have a lot of experience with replication.
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