Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 243
  • Last Modified:

A unique SSID for each Access Point or one SSID for them all?

I have three access points to give wireless cover in a residential house. I have situated each of the access points at the range limit of the others but there is still overlap so I get continuous cover.
I assume that I should put each on a separate channel but should I also give each a unique SSID or should I just give the same SSID to each and therefore just have one SSID for the house?
0
ClintonK
Asked:
ClintonK
  • 5
  • 4
1 Solution
 
Craig BeckCommented:
Separate channel (1, 6 and 11 for 2.4GHz band) but same SSID and security settings.  That will let the client device move between APs without having a long break in service.  It won't be completely seamless but it should take less than a second or so to move between APs.
0
 
ClintonKAuthor Commented:
are channels 1,2 and 3 too close to each other? I have a Sonos music system that only allows me 1,6 or 11
Are 1,6 and 11 the preferred ones for the access points because they occupy lower, middle and top of the range?
0
 
Craig BeckCommented:
1,2 and 3 all overlap with eachother.  That's bad as it will cause an effect called co-channel interference and will degrade performance.

The channels at 2.4GHz occupy some of the adjacent channel's space, either side of the channel you're on.  Each channel is 22MHz wide but each channel is only separated by 5MHz.  This means that each channel overlaps with other channels.

For example, Channel 6's centre-frequency is 2437MHz.  Channel 5's is 2432MHz.  This means that channels 5 and 6 overlap with eachother.  There's a good graphic here...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels

Channels 1, 6 and 11 are the only channels which don't overlap with eachother at all at 2.4GHz (this is universal, but in Europe and Japan you could use 1, 7 and 13) so you should use those to ensure that you don't interfere with your own APs.
0
Prepare for your VMware VCP6-DCV exam.

Josh Coen and Jason Langer have prepared the latest edition of VCP study guide. Both authors have been working in the IT field for more than a decade, and both hold VMware certifications. This 163-page guide covers all 10 of the exam blueprint sections.

 
ClintonKAuthor Commented:
so if I have three access points and Sonos on 1, 6 or 11 am I stuck?
Would a 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz AP's be more easier?
0
 
Craig BeckCommented:
If your Sonos kit is running its own WiFi network it may cause problems.  You would be running it all on one channel though, so you could use two channels for your APs and leave the Sonos kit on the third channel.

Let's say you have 3 APs in a line.  As long as AP1 can't see AP3 you can use the same channel on both APs, while AP2 (in the middle) could use the remaining free channel (as the Sonos would use the third free channel).  So you would end up with:

AP1 - Ch6
AP2 - Ch1
AP3 - Ch6
Sonos - Ch11

That would be fine.

However, I believe that all WiFi Sonos kit can now connect to a home WiFi network instead of only its own.  This would mean that each Sonos unit would use whatever channel the AP it connects to uses, and that would mean you get the third channel back for use on the WiFi network.
0
 
ClintonKAuthor Commented:
That's all really helpful, thanks. I've not tried turning off Sonos wifi yet but I think that may be the best option.
The advice then is to keep the channels away from each other so they don't overlap (choose 1,6,11 if they can all see each other) and give them all the same SSIDs. Also reconfigure Sonos to use the home wifi and release a valuable channel.
0
 
Craig BeckCommented:
Sounds good :-)
0
 
ClintonKAuthor Commented:
All good information.
Keep the channels away from each other so they don't overlap (choose 1,6,11 - assuming they can all see each other) and give them all the same SSIDs

Thanks
0
 
Natty GregIn Theory (IT)Commented:
Always separate the channels, and the fail over is seamless and client will not notice any fail over
0
 
Craig BeckCommented:
Always separate the channels, and the fail over is seamless and client will not notice any fail over
Unless 802.1x is used to authenticate users this is not correct.  Channel separation does not aid in seamless roaming.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Path Explorer

An intuitive utility to help find the CSS path to UI elements on a webpage. These paths are used frequently in a variety of front-end development and QA automation tasks.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

  • 5
  • 4
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now