I have only 1 public ip, although I have 2 applications on port 443 that need to be usable externally.  Is there something else I can do to get them both natted to the outside?
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Stephen BerkConnect With a Mentor Senior Network EngineerCommented:
NAT is happening at the IP and TCP layers, so you either need another IP address or you need to move one of your TCP/443 apps to a different port. It probably isn't feasible to move the app to a different port (assuming its public facing), so a 2nd IP address is probably your easiest and/or cheapest option.

That said, Rich is right on with his suggestion of a reverse proxy. I use F5 Big-IP's in this setup and let the URI's of the various web apps dictate how I will forward traffic to the servers being proxied. Here's a doc from F5 that gives an intro to URI translation ( and how the Big-IP proxies traffic. Don't get lost in the details, it's really just to show you what conceptually what's happening. And don't think you need an F5 solution to get a reverse proxy for web traffic. The Big-IP is an enterprise solution that handles much more than reverse proxying. Apache, Nginx, and Squid are all software proxies you can load onto a Linux server.

The Q&D: 443 traffic comes in from the Internet, the firewall NAT's to an address on the reverse proxy, the reverse proxy examines the URI and forwards to some web server.
Rich WeisslerConnect With a Mentor Professional Troublemaker^h^h^h^h^hshooterCommented:
A reverse proxy comes to mind.
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