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finding version of access mdb that is given to you.. (older file)

Posted on 2015-01-29
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Last Modified: 2015-01-31
This access file is probably 2000 or 2002 or 2003.. is there a way to confirm what exactly is the version of the access file (mdb).

thanks.
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Question by:25112
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by:PatHartman
PatHartman earned 72 total points
ID: 40579093
Set db = CurrentDb()
Me.txtAccessVersion = db.Properties("AccessVersion")
Me.txtJetVersion = db.Version

This is code behind a form hence the "Me." references.
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by:IrogSinta
IrogSinta earned 72 total points
ID: 40579103
Well one way would be to open the database and type CTRL-G, then in the Immediate Window, enter the following:
?SysCmd(acSysCmdAccessVer)

If the result you get is 9.0, you have Access 2000.
8.0 - Access 97
9.0 - Access 2000
10.0 - Access 2002
11.0 - Access 2003

Ron
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by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP)
DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP) earned 284 total points
ID: 40579108
That tells you the version of Microsoft Access you are in ... not the version of the actual MDB format.

I have an A2000 mdb  open in A2013 ...
?SysCmd(acSysCmdAccessVer)
15.0
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by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP)
DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP) earned 284 total points
ID: 40579113
And .Version just gives you a number like 4.0 ... which is not to useful
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by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP)
DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP) earned 284 total points
ID: 40579145
OK I found this ... and it seems to be accurate ... will need to add Cases for later versions
Basically it's using CurrentProject.FileFormat

Dim objAccess As Object
Set objAccess = CreateObject("Access.Application")
objAccess.OpenCurrentDatabase "C:\Access2003Clients\BLM\Data\AMAPSData.mdb"

intFormat = objAccess.CurrentProject.FileFormat

Select Case intFormat
    Case 2: Debug.Print "Microsoft Access 2"
    Case 7: Debug.Print "Microsoft Access 95"
    Case 8: Debug.Print "Microsoft Access 97"
    Case 9: Debug.Print "Microsoft Access 2000"
    Case 10: Debug.Print "Microsoft Access 2003"

End Select
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by:DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP)
DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Access MVP) earned 284 total points
ID: 40579152
Seems for an A2013 ACCDB  the number is 12, which means that ...so ???

So I'm guessing from this  we cannot definitely tell exactly WHICH version of Access it really is.
Not sure what 11 - if it even exists - would be.  Might be A2007 ... IF ... there was any change between an A2007, A2010 and A2013 ACCDBs ...

And since 9 is 2000 and 10 is 2003 (I tested both of these) ... then A2002 is also 9 ... and I don't think there was any file format change between A2000 and A2002 ( aka XP).
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Monika Bharti earned 72 total points
ID: 40579192
Hi,

I think i got a relevant article written by David Klein to determine the version of (.mdb) Access file. The following article helps you to resolve your query of finding version of access mdb, he tried to accomplish that without opening the Access mdb database.

http://www.ssw.com.au/ssw/kb/KB.aspx?KBID=Q989827
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by:25112
ID: 40582091
helped.thanks.
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