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How do I import a htm file into a table

Posted on 2015-01-31
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Last Modified: 2015-01-31
A computer system that we use generates a weekly report that can be exported to excel. The file created has a .xls extension but when I open the file MS Excel says it's not in the correct format. Nevertheless it will open the file into a standard spreadsheet.

When I looked at the file with NotePad I realised it's actually a HTML file and if I change the extension to .html and launch it, it opens the spreadsheet in my web browser.

What I need to do is import the data into an Access table so I can then extract some of the data and save it in a format that we need for another application.
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Question by:Rob4077
7 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Dan Craciun
ID: 40581312
From Excel, save it as a xls or xlsx file, then you'll be able to import it into Access.

HTH,
Dan
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Author Comment

by:Rob4077
ID: 40581326
That works but it means I have to:
1. export the file,
2. open it,
3. do a save as using the same name and make sure I save as xls file
4. replace the existing file with the same name.

Is there an easy way I can get MS Access to do that? Or do I need to get Access to launch an Excel session and do the process? If I do that, can I suppress the warning that the file is not in a proper xls format?
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Accepted Solution

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Rey Obrero earned 500 total points
ID: 40581342
try this codes, from access

dim xlObj as object, strFile as string
strFile="<path and filename>"
set xlObj = CreateObject("excel.application")
     xlObj.application.displayalerts=false
     xlObj.Workbooks.Open strFile

    xlObj.activeworkbook.saveas strfile, fileformat:=56

xlObj.quit
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Expert Comment

by:PatHartman
ID: 40581495
Did you try GetExternalData/More/HTML?
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Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 40582031
<No Points Wanted, just FYI>
The file created has a .xls extension but when I open the file MS Excel says it's not in the correct format. Nevertheless it will open the file into a standard spreadsheet.
When I looked at the file with NotePad I realised it's actually a HTML
Then this file is actually a .xlsx file...
So if you changed the extension to.xlsx, ...it should open in Excel 2007 or higher without issue.

JeffCoachman
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Expert Comment

by:Dan Craciun
ID: 40582166
The xslx is a zip. Do you think you'll see html code in it if you open it with Notepad?
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Author Comment

by:Rob4077
ID: 40582180
Hi Jeff, Just tried renaming the extension to xlsx but it still came up with the same warning so your conclusion doesn't apply to this type of file.

Dan, your solution worked but I wanted to automate it

Rey, your solution worked perfectly. Thanks
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