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How to use PDC/DNS server on 2 subnets?

Posted on 2015-01-31
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Last Modified: 2015-02-03
I have a PDC/DNS server on 192.168.2.1.  
I added a 2nd NIC with IP 192.168.0.3.

I moved a domain-joined machine to 192.168.0.15 and changed 2nd DNS setting to 192.168.0.3, but it cannot contact the domain for services.

What do I need to do so that the domain-joined machine can contact the domain for services?
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Question by:CPA_MCSE
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8 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:arnold
ID: 40582032
usually, subletting is done in a router versus adding additional network cards to systems .

The issue might be that in response to the locate DC one of the IPs is on a segment to which this systems seems to lack access.

Are you looking to setup the pdc/DNS as a router in which case you need to configure its IP in the .3 network as the gateway for those systems.
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Expert Comment

by:arnold
ID: 40582035
Look at your netmasks on the segments to make sure they do not overlap.
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Expert Comment

by:Mahesh
ID: 40583429
If you are trying to make DC as a windows RRAS lan router, you need to enable RRAS on this DC as server role
Also DC LAN IP need to be set on clients as default gateway

If you want to do this, do it on member server instead of doing it on DC directly
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Author Comment

by:CPA_MCSE
ID: 40584556
Thanks for the replies, but here is a little more background:

Everything in the 192.168.2.xxx network are Hyper-V guests running on a single host which has a single physical NIC on the 192.168.0.xxx network (and an internal NIC isolating the Hyper-V guests).  I moved one of those guest machines to my laptop on the 192.168.0.xxx network.

I would still like for the moved  machine to communicate with the 192.168.2.xxx network for various services.  I figured adding a 2nd NIC to the 192.168.2.1 PDC/DNS server so that it could be accessed from the 192.168.0.xxx network would do the trick, but no dice.

I just want the one machine to communicate with the machines within the Hyper-V 192.168.2.xxx network.

Suggestions?
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Expert Comment

by:Mahesh
ID: 40584574
The network 192.168.2.0/x is your internal subnet on hyper-V or it is bridged network connected to external NIC of hyper-V host?

If 192.168.2.x is internal subnet on hyper-v, you won't be able to connect to that network from outside hyper-v server

To do what you are trying to do, you need to add one more physical Ethernet card to hyper-v server and then you can use that card to create another hyper-v network and it will work, routing server role can be enabled on Hyper-V server itself and you can use both hyper-V NICs IP as default gateway on other machines so that they can communicate with each other
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Author Comment

by:CPA_MCSE
ID: 40584788
The network 192.168.2.0/x is your internal subnet on hyper-V or it is bridged network connected to external NIC of hyper-V host?  

It is an internal subnet on Hyper-V.

If 192.168.2.x is internal subnet on hyper-v, you won't be able to connect to that network from outside hyper-v server

Hence, why I added the NIC to the PDC/DNS server (192.168.0.3).  I can communicate both ways TO/FROM the 198.168.0.0/x network TO/FROM that guest machine.  So, that being the case, I should be able to do what I am trying to do.  

I just want the 192.168.0.15 machine to use services on the 192.168.2.0/x network.  Suggestions?

I am thinking the solution should be just configuring something in DNS...
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Accepted Solution

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Mahesh earned 500 total points
ID: 40585543
What I mean "Internal network" means hyper-V virtual network created on hyper-v host which can communicate with Hyper-V server and Guest VM only
Is this your case I think?
Hyper-V virtual network with type *internal* and *private* cannot communicate with external world.

U need to add new physical network card on hyper-V server and need to create new *external* network from that NIC so that your VMs can communicate to external world.

Ex:
On Hyper-V server:
1st physical NIC 192.168.0.1/24
2nd physical NIC 192.168.2.1/24

You can create 1st external network thru hyper-v (say EXT1) - pointing to 192.168.0.1
You can create 2nd external network thru hyper-v (say EXT2) - pointing to 192.168.2.1
U need to create your VMs by specifying any \ both of external networks above.

Now you should be able to access VMs on both network from outside world.
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Author Closing Comment

by:CPA_MCSE
ID: 40587964
(*Facepalm*)  I thought that is what I did since the physical machine has dual NICs.  When I "converted" the 192.168.2.0/x network to an internal network recently, I thought it would use software NIC drivers and leave both my physical NICs available.  I see now there is only one physical NIC (192.168.0.10) recognized on the physical machine.  So, yeah, it now makes perfect sense that I need another physical NIC since the "internal network" is still hogging the other physical NIC.

Luckily, I have an old working NIC laying around, and I will take care of that pronto.  THANKS!
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