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How do identify a "break in coveage"

I have a simple table in Oracle 11g that contains a date-range for a customer:

customerNumber integer
startDate date
endDate date

CUSTOMERNUMBER   STARTDATE   ENDDATE   
             1   2013-01-01  2013-12-31
             1   2014-01-01  2014-05-31
             1   2014-06-01  2014-12-31
             1   2015-01-02  2015-12-31
             2   2015-01-01  2015-01-31
             2   2015-03-01  2015-03-31

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I would like to identify “breaks in coverage”. For example, customerNumber 1 had a one-day break in coverage between 2014-12-31 and 2015-01-02. Also, customerNumber 2 had a one-month break in coverage in February of this year. How would I best identify that?

Thanks in advance!
DaveSlash
0
Dave Ford
Asked:
Dave Ford
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1 Solution
 
slightwv (䄆 Netminder) Commented:
Try this:
select customernumber, (nextstartdate-enddate)-1 from (
      select customernumber, enddate, lead(startdate) over(partition by customernumber order by startdate) nextstartdate
      from simple_table
)
where nextstartdate-enddate > 1
/
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sdstuberCommented:
your data has discrete ranges

can they overlap?
0
 
Dave FordSoftware Developer / Database AdministratorAuthor Commented:
No. The ranges cannot overlap.
0
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Dave FordSoftware Developer / Database AdministratorAuthor Commented:
slightwv,

You are THE MAN! Thanks!

select *
  from MySchema.SimpleTable
;

CUSTOMERNUMBER STARTDATE ENDDATE  
-------------- --------- ---------
             1 01-JAN-13 31-DEC-13
             1 01-JAN-14 31-MAY-14
             1 01-JUN-14 31-DEC-14
             1 02-JAN-15 31-DEC-15
             2 01-JAN-15 31-JAN-15
             2 01-MAR-15 31-MAR-15
             3 02-JAN-15 31-DEC-15
             3 01-JAN-16 31-DEC-16

8 rows selected.

select customerNumber,
       startDate,
       endDate,
       (nextstartDate - endDate) - 1 as gap
  from (    select customernumber,
                   startDate,
                   enddate,
                   lead(startdate) over(partition by customernumber order by startdate) nextstartdate
              from MySchema.SimpleTable )
 where nextstartdate - enddate > 1
;


CUSTOMERNUMBER STARTDATE ENDDATE          GAP
-------------- --------- --------- ----------
             1 01-JUN-14 31-DEC-14          1
             2 01-JAN-15 31-JAN-15         28

2 rows selected.
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Dave FordSoftware Developer / Database AdministratorAuthor Commented:
Thanks again, slightwv. I really do appreciate your help.

It even works the same using a WITH clause:

with IncludesTheNextOne as (
  select customernumber,
         startDate,
         enddate,
         lead(startDate) over(partition by customerNumber order by startDate) as nextStartDate
    from MySchema.SimpleTable )
select customerNumber,
       startDate,
       endDate,
       (nextstartDate - endDate) - 1 as theGap
  from IncludesTheNextOne
 where nextStartDate - endDate > 1
;

CUSTOMERNUMBER STARTDATE ENDDATE          GAP
-------------- --------- --------- ----------
             1 01-JUN-14 31-DEC-14          1
             2 01-JAN-15 31-JAN-15         28

2 rows selected.

Personally, I find the WITH clause to be slightly easier to read, but what do you think? Does it affect performance or readability?
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slightwv (䄆 Netminder) Commented:
Based on how it looks that Oracle implemented CTE, I don't think it matters.

Run execution plans on both and I bet you will find they are the same.

In case you don't know how:
explain plan for
select ...
/

Then to display the plan:
select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);


Both methods are basically inline views.

I would probably use CTE if I needed the same 'view' multiple times in the resulting query.

My SQL pre-dates CTE so my first choice is ALWAYS inline views without WITH.
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sdstuberCommented:
For a single-use CTE, the optimizer will often (but not always) rewrite it internally as an inline view.

The other option is to materialize it into a temp table on the fly.
(The undocumented MATERIALIZE hint can help here, but not really recommended)

If you use reuse the CTE multiple times this materialization can be immensely helpful.

I too like WITH clauses as a readability thing too.  Modularizes the code nicely.
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Dave FordSoftware Developer / Database AdministratorAuthor Commented:
Thanks again, gentlemen. The explain-plan comes out exactly the same for the two queries involved.
0
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