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Sybase 2 MS SQL migration/conversion

Posted on 2015-02-04
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Last Modified: 2015-02-09
I am working with an organization that has an application with a Sybase database.  The vendor of that software has changed the database to MS SQL.  Initially, the vendor made a big deal about the migration/conversion process.  Since it's the same vendor, I'm thinking that it should not be a big deal.  When I asked them what migration tool they are using, they said that they are using straight SQL.

Does that mean that in the development of the new MS SQL database, they used the tables in the entity relationship diagram of the Sybase database, and mapped the new database tables in the MS SQL database, and they used SQL to "transfer" the fields to the new database?  ... and as such the migration or the conversion, should be easy with any major problems?

Thank you.
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Question by:DigitalCro
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4 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:PortletPaul
ID: 40590254
There are substantial similarities between Sybase and MSSQL
In 1987 Microsoft and Sybase started a partnership to build/sell a Database Management System
SQL MythBusters – "SQL Server is really a Sybase product not a Microsoft one."

And there are Microsoft utilities to assist in converting from Sybase to SQL Server: SQL Server Migration Assistant (SSMA)

But I'm not confident I can offer a definite opinion about "is it simple" for a specific migration that I know so little about.
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Author Comment

by:DigitalCro
ID: 40595632
Thank you for your input.

Can you provide some information about the "straight SQL" aspect.  What would that mean?

Thank you.
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PortletPaul earned 500 total points
ID: 40596246
There isn't, so far as I know, a precise definition of "straight sql".

 It excludes any non-sql approaches or software, but allows anything that is permitted in SQL (queries, procedures, functions, inserts, updates). It MIGHT exclude "procedural" SQL extensions (e.g. using cursors) depending on the author and context, but here I cannot tell, but using cursors really doesn't matter overall.

Basically it just means they have used SQL and not some proprietary ETL (Extract Transform Load) product.
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Author Closing Comment

by:DigitalCro
ID: 40599246
Thank you.

You are the best !
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