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Access 2013 SQL backend?

Posted on 2015-02-06
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Hi

I don't have MS Office 2013 and was told that it now has a SQL backend and has moved away from the 2010 and previous versions' format. Is this true? Can the database be split and the SQL backend be used as a normal SQL database?
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Question by:Murray Brown
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Gustav Brock earned 1000 total points
ID: 40595362
I always wonder who tells such stories.

Nothing has changed in this regard since Access 2007. You can have backends of accdb, mdb (Jet version 4), SQL Server, or any other database engine you can attach via ODBC or ADO.

/gustav
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by:Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 1000 total points
ID: 40595483
I use 2013 in my day-to-day work, and as gustav said nothing has changed, other than web apps. Web apps always have a SQL back end, so perhaps that's what you've been reading.
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by:Murray Brown
ID: 40595494
Thanks for setting that straight!
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LVL 58
ID: 40595592
yes, that's true, but as Scott was suggesting, they were talking about web apps.

  Access has split into two almost separate products:

1. The old "desktop" style apps - In regards to these, nothing has changed in regards to using SQL as a backend.   A2013 however did depreciate a number of features, one of which was ADP's (native interface to SQL).  That doesn't mean you still can 't use SQL as a backend via ODBC and linked tables or OLEDB/ADO (note however that Microsoft is moving away from OLEDB - ADO does have ODBC providers though, so you'll still be able to use ADO even so if you want).

2. Web Databases/Apps - This is what you heard about.

  Web Databases were found in A2007/2010 and used SharePoint lists to store data, which did not work well and was limited.  More than 5000 or so records and you would start to see performance problems.

 With A2013, web databases were discarded and you now have web apps, which still run through SharePoint, which is where the "front end" executes, but the data is now in a SQL backend.   Thus they are highly scalable.

  A2013 itself is only used for the development of the app.  Once developed, you package it up and deploy to SharePoint.

 I would also add that at this point, development of Access on the desktop side by Microsoft is pretty much dead and has been since A2007.   Their entire focus is the web side of things.

 So what you've got to work with is what you've got.  Don't expect any new features on the desktop side of things.

HTH,
Jim.
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LVL 75
ID: 40595859
Actually .,. I'm pretty sure murbro was asking or thinking about what Jim posted ... Access Web Apps that automatically get a SQL Server back end.

Just sayin' ...

mx
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LVL 58
ID: 40595898
I was trying to clarify a bit ...nothing need be done.

 Anyone reading this will walk away with the right info.

Jim.
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