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Win7 only new folder showing

Posted on 2015-02-09
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Last Modified: 2015-02-11
Did a new install  Win 7 x64 SP1 on a new 1 TB sata drive.  When I log in as the local 'administrator' I can right-click within the C: drive and I have all the options to create a 'new folder', 'new text document', 'new briefcase', etc...  

However when I create another local administrator (ie. User1) and I right-click within the C: drive I only get the option to create a new 'Folder'.  

Anyone know why this is happening.?  I shouldn't have to mess with ntfs permissions.  If I make another local admin I should already have full access.
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Question by:jkimzlg
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by:jcimarron
ID: 40598865
jkimzlg --
Actually the action for the second local administrator is normal.  See the section labeled "Note"  at the top of this reference.
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/28677-new-context-menu-remove-restore-default-menu-items.html

However that reference may help you add the other options to the New command.
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by:Will Szymkowski
ID: 40598879
Obviously check first to see if the account is actually in the local administrators group on the machine. Second, i have just tested this and right clicking in the right hand pane (where all of the folders are located) provides me with a complete list of objects to create.

However, when i click on the C:\ (left and column) right click i only get folder or briefcase. I believe this is by design. Just make sure that the user is in fact an local administrator.

Will.
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by:jkimzlg
ID: 40598904
jcimarron, those registry edits only edit c:\users\<profile>\, but unfortunately don't seem to work for the C: drive

will, please take a look at my screen shot, hopefully this explains it all.  still no dice.
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by:jcimarron
ID: 40598982
jkimzlg--
As mentioned earlier that is actually normal behavior for C: drive, C:\Windows folder, C:\Program Files folder, C:\Program Files (x86) folder, and C:\Users folder.

A work around might be to modify the Send To command.
http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/45421-send-context-menu-remove-restore-default-items.html
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by:jkimzlg
ID: 40599135
I agree that it may be normal behavior now.  But I have a pc I'm using right now that doesn't do this.  My OS is a Win 7 Pro SP1.  I'm able to create another local administrator account and when I right-click within the c: drive and within c:\program files (x86) I get the full list of menus  ('new folder', 'new text document', 'new briefcase', etc...).  

what has caused this?  what has changed?  is this some type of Windows update that Microsoft has implemented?

As you can see from the attached file I have created a local administrator called 'user' and they have the options (please see pic)
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by:jcimarron
ID: 40599292
jkimzlg--
The behavior you see often occurs when you have migrated from XP to Win 7.
Does this apply to the second PC?
Whether or not this is so, the answer seems to be in changing the Ownership of the folders that now offer only "New".
See http://superuser.com/questions/215360/how-to-reenable-the-new-context-menu-items-for-an-administrator-when-right-c
and scroll down to the section titled
"Steps I've taken that have succeeded to add the new context menu items:"  
And continue reading until the end of the second item in the "Answers" section at the bottom
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by:jkimzlg
ID: 40599316
Thanks, but my very first post says that I 'Did a new install  Win 7 x64 SP1 on a new 1 TB sata drive'.  I think you've done some good research, but your link is supposed to be for a 2nd hard drive that you're not using as an OS.  If you look at a normal ntfs permissions on the C: drive 'Authenticated Users' won't have any permissions.  By doing this I would most likely screw up the c: drive.
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by:jcimarron
ID: 40599404
jkimzlg--
You might just have a look at the permissions on the two PC's and see how they differ.

As mentioned twice, the behavior of the second Win 7 PC is normal.  Why the first PC performs as Win XP I do not know.
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by:jkimzlg
ID: 40599536
have you tried this on your pc?  I tried 3 other pc's and this behavior is not occurring.  I'm able to create another local admin account and the get the full list of menus  ('new folder', 'new text document', 'new briefcase', etc...) within the c: drive.
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by:jcimarron
ID: 40599681
jkimzlg--
What is the reluctance to look at the permissions on the two PC's?  I did not suggest you do anything.
No, I have not tried it.  I only have on PC and this is not a problem for me.
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by:jkimzlg
ID: 40599737
the permissions are both identical on the C: drives (one that has the context menu and one that does not).  In the 'Advanced Security Settings' it says 'TrustedInstaller', Under 'Effective Permissions' they both have 'Create folders / append data'.  Even when I go to the 'Advanced' then 'Permissions' tab then 'Change Permissions', they are identical.
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VB ITS earned 500 total points
ID: 40600676
This is good ol' User Account Control (UAC) that's causing this problem.

Try these steps which will give you the ability to create items other than folders in the root of the C: drive:
- Click Start then click on Run (or press Windows + R)
- Type in secpol.msc then click OK
- Expand Local Policies then click on Security Options
- Towards the bottom locate User Account Control: Run all administrators in Admin Approval Mode and change the setting to Disabled
- Restart the computer when prompted
- Try right clicking in the root of the C: drive - you will then see the various items you would normally expect in the right click context menu

Why does this happen with accounts that are part of the local Administrators group but not the default Administrator account? Because the default Administrator account does not actually run in Admin Approval Mode, so it has unrestricted access to all areas of the system. All other administrator accounts are forced to run in Admin Approval Mode (as you saw in the above procedure where you disabled it).

Haven't you ever wondered why you have to add your own account to folder permissions even though you could see the Administrators group in the access list? Well Admin Approval Mode is what causes this.

You'll also find that you won't need to run programs as an administrator to perform administrative tasks when Admin Approval Mode is disabled. This is probably the reason why Microsoft disables the default Administrator account in the first place, as UAC is effectively disabled completely on this account giving you unrestricted access to the system.

With all that being said, I don't recommend leaving Admin Approval Mode off as it's a pretty big security risk. If this were a file server that was in a network being properly protected then I'd disable the setting as it gets annoying having to add your alternate admin account access to shared folders all the time.
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by:jkimzlg
ID: 40603416
VS ITS, u the man....
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